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  1. #1

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    Infrared filter?

    I don't have much experience with infrared, and I was thinking of shooting a still-life in front of a backdrop. If I use a black backdrop, is there a filter I should be using to make the black appear darker and richer?

  2. #2
    sparx's Avatar
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    Depending on the film you are using you should use a dark red or even a dedicated infra red filter to get the required results. The individual film manufactures data sheets should be able to tell you what is required.
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  3. #3
    Jon Butler's Avatar
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    Infrared filter?

    A red filter is the your best starting point, my choice is an Ilford SFX filter but if your using an SLR you can not see though it.

    JON

  4. #4

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    Good choice there.

    The thing with IR is that the more visible light you take OUT the weirder the effect is. Remember that IR film will pick up normal light too. So the less of that there is, the better. Hence they had dedicated IR filters, mostly for work with Kodak HIE which to us are opaque! Very effective. But a bitch to focus with.

    As to the backdrop....that depends. If you take out all the visible light you may get something, for various reasons that is either darker or lighter than you expected. This is where you will need to experiment. When you shoot IR without visible light, you get some strange effects. Look at plants.

    Grass goes white, some leaves go dark, some white, I mean it is all over the place. So shoot and see what you get.
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  5. #5
    glbeas's Avatar
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    That black backdrop may surprise you. Quite a few synthetic fabrics dyed black simply look white in infrared. A little testing is in order, though natural materials are more likely to exhibit little tonal shift.
    Gary Beasley

  6. #6
    wdemere's Avatar
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    You might find this link helpful:

    http://www.cocam.co.uk/CoCamWS/Infrared/INFRARED.HTM

    There are a couple of infrared books listed here too:

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Books/Photo/photo.html

    I have the Infrared Photography Handbook by Laurie White and it seems to be considered the standard reference.

    Best of luck,

    William

  7. #7
    jim kirk jr.'s Avatar
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    One more idea,depending if you want to use natural light only.shoot outside-if you can find a location with the sun at your back,depending upon film and filter used(also depending upon what you want to shoot and if it can be placed on something)you can use the sky if it's blue as a backdrop.just don't include the bottom of the horizon as it may fade to grey then white.
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