Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,303   Posts: 1,536,254   Online: 744
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    487

    HC110 and Fomapan 100

    HC110 is not a recommended developer for Fomapan 100. Let us discuss why this might be so.

    I have been able to glean the following possible reasons, based on comments I have seen on various web pages as well as some of my own testing.

    1) There is a large loss of film speed with this film/developer combination.
    2) Development times are too short when using reasonable dilutions of HC110.
    3) There is an excessively upswept density curve with this film/developer combination.
    4) Contrast tends to be hard to tame, perhaps a reflection of the interaction between items 2 and 3.

    What do you think? Are any or all of these reasons true? Are there other issues to consider as well?

  2. #2
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    It being a standard general-purpose developer, I would be surprised if HC-110 is specifically not recommended by a manufacturer for any b/w film. Did you actually read a manufacturer's recommendation to not use it, or is it just not on a development chart?

    The differences in results between HC-110 and D-76 are there, but they are not large. Both are extremely versatile general-purpose developers, with the largest practical difference being how they differ in use (i.e. in how the working solutions are prepared). Additionally, if you use a double dilution of HC-110 B (unofficially known by many as dilution H), the differences between the results from this and D-76 straight or 1:1 would be hard to spot at all.f
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,252
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by alanrockwood View Post
    HC110 is not a recommended developer for Fomapan 100. Let us discuss why this might be so.

    I have been able to glean the following possible reasons, based on comments I have seen on various web pages as well as some of my own testing.

    1) There is a large loss of film speed with this film/developer combination.
    2) Development times are too short when using reasonable dilutions of HC110.
    3) There is an excessively upswept density curve with this film/developer combination.
    4) Contrast tends to be hard to tame, perhaps a reflection of the interaction between items 2 and 3.

    What do you think? Are any or all of these reasons true? Are there other issues to consider as well?
    Seems a good summary of why I wouldn't use HC110 with Fomapan 100 or 200.

    I've used quite a lot of Fomapan 100 & 200, I'd guess over a 100 rolls of 120 and a few boxes of LF and compared to all other manufacturers films it requires 2/3rds to 3/4qts the development to reach similar contrasts.densities and the contrast rises very quickly with over development.

    HC110 may be a very convenient developer but it doesn't have all the required attributes of fine grain and reasonable film speed and sharpness which Kodak acknowledge in their developer comparison chart.

    So yes I agree with all those points.

    Ian

  4. #4
    Bundesphotograph's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lower Saxony
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    87
    Fomapan 100 seems to look very nice with HC-110:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/10239287@N06/3600331849/

  5. #5
    CPorter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    West KY
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,662
    Images
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Bundesphotograph View Post
    Fomapan 100 seems to look very nice with HC-110:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/10239287@N06/3600331849/
    Indeed it does.......HC-110 has an upswept curve with every film I've used it with, but I can't say much about the claim of an "excessive" upswept curve.

  6. #6
    mrred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    660
    Images
    4
    If you look at that shot, the dorway shadow (bottom right) leaves a better clue why it is high contrast. It was taken from 11:00 to 1:00 on some sunny day. Not a good example.

    I have found that HC-110 works quite well with Foma 100 in higher dilutions. But I tend to want all my films to be developed over 10 mins for everything I do.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    487
    Any additional thoughts or experience with this film/developer combination?

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    775
    Images
    28
    When exposed and developed properly, I see no reason why HC-110 wouldn't be a good choice. I've seen it work well a couple of times in a lab I was working at. I can see how it would be finicky though as we had some extreme results with a seasoned HC-110 developer that was much more forgiving than the fresh stuff. However, I would blame that more on the photographer's exposures being all over the place.

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,252
    Images
    148
    Part of the issue is that Fomapan 100 & 200 are much more responsive to slight changes in exposure and development (time or temperature). So slight under-exposre and over-development means the contrast shoots up considerably whereas it would be just a slight increase with other films like Tmax, Delta , FP4, HP5, Tri-X etc.

    It's particularly important with these Foma films to run your own film speed/development time tests, and the issue with using HC110 is the very short times involved, Foma films typically need 66% to 75% of the times of other films. That shortening makes HC!!) far less practical as it's much harder to be consistent.

    Once the film speed/dev time issue is resolved for your own way of working these films easy to work with.

    Ian



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin