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  1. #21

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    Thanks Murray, I wish I had posted that as I fully agree.

    Mike

  2. #22
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer View Post
    Some time ago I wrote in Photo Techniques about "perverting" HC110 by adding ascorbic acid and carbonate. At that time I had not thought of Glycol or TEA. My latest experiment is the following:

    750 ml TEA
    32 g ascorbic or erythorbic acid
    Heat until dissolved

    Add 250 ml of HC110 concentrate.

    This mixture is a concentrate. It seems to be a pretty "hot" developer at 1+50 dilution with water. 8 minutes or so at 70 F will get about normal contrast with HP5+.
    I'm curious about this...therefore I think I'll try it as soon as I can get the chemicals. Half the recipe at first, though, as I don't want to use up half of my HC-110. Besides, at 1:50 dilution, 500ml will last quite a while.

    I'll try it with different films as well. I'll have a roll of FP4 as well as a roll of Pan-F to use. I can probably test with Tri-X and HP5 as well. Scans will take a while, though, as I do not have a scanner capable of doing film at the moment.

    So, to half it:

    375ml of TEA
    16g of Ascorbic asid
    heat until dissolved

    add 125ml HC-110 concentrate.

    Dilute 1:50.

    Any advice?
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  3. #23
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Having the scanner is only half the issue. I must have 5 rolls that were processed that I don't have time or want to scan yet. Scanner is under the computer hutch with stacks of things needing scanning on it. All that has to be hauled out to access it. What I need is a TABLE.
    Murray

  4. #24
    gainer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim View Post
    I'm curious about this...therefore I think I'll try it as soon as I can get the chemicals. Half the recipe at first, though, as I don't want to use up half of my HC-110. Besides, at 1:50 dilution, 500ml will last quite a while.

    I'll try it with different films as well. I'll have a roll of FP4 as well as a roll of Pan-F to use. I can probably test with Tri-X and HP5 as well. Scans will take a while, though, as I do not have a scanner capable of doing film at the moment.

    So, to half it:

    375ml of TEA
    16g of Ascorbic asid
    heat until dissolved

    add 125ml HC-110 concentrate.

    Dilute 1:50.

    Any advice?
    Before you do, try:

    100 ml TEA
    9 grams ascorbic acid
    0.2 grams Phenidone
    Heat to about the temperature of hot cocoa and stir it til it dissolves. It will stay dissolved after it cools. Don't bother with the HC110. For use, 15 ml (1/2 tsp) with water to make 150 ml and develop FP4+ about 8 minutes at 70 F. The stock gets pretty thick and can freeze at about 70 F, or it can supercool.

    My allusion to the jewelry was to express the opinion that sometimes simple is good enough if not better. Ascorbate ion is a vitamin, an antioxidant, and a photographic reducing agent.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #25
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
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    Also, Patrick, I recommend your PCB (phenidone, VitC, Borax- in another thread).
    Probably about the same pH and really simple. Slow disolving borax would be my only complaint! :-)

    Even worked well with Copex Rapid microfilm.

    Has become my 'standard' for simplicity and results.

    Murray

  6. #26
    gainer's Avatar
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    I wonder how many of you have bought a commercially available developer on the basis of side-by-side comparisons with one of its competitors?

    If I can get a developer concentrate that has the good qualities of HC110 and is cheaper simply by adding some ascorbic acid to the HC110, and you are a user of HC110, is it too much to ask of you to risk a small bit of film, HC110 and ascorbic acid to see for yourself whether I speak the truth, especially since I did publish the very kind of comparison you seek in Photo Techniques magazine? I compared the effects of increasing the hydroquinone in HC110, adding ascorbic acid, and both.

    It is cheaper simply because ascorbic acid is cheap and decreases the required working concentration of HC110 significantly without affecting its good qualities.
    Gadget Gainer

  7. #27

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    Speaking of the good qualities of HC-110, the Silvergrain website, disappointingly, has this to say:

    HC-110 is a highly concentrated developer manufactured by Eastman Kodak Company.

    The image quality of this developer for pictorial applications is poor and I see no advantage in this product other than convenience, low cost and rapid processing. The disadvantages are: speed comparable to D-76 or often slightly lower, coarser grain than D-76 (except for some films including TMX) and mediocre sharpness.
    Last edited by jackc; 04-10-2008 at 04:24 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Jack;

    There is a whole thread on this from about a week ago.

    PE

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