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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by dafy View Post
    Thanks Existing Light. ATP is EI 25 with SPUR (for *me* so far, only shot a couple of rolls), but they say 32 I believe. I used to shoot Tech Pan at EI 6 and the stain from PMK was awesome.

    I have been scanning a lot lately, but am still learning. Scanning my BW negs yields good results, but being 35mm the only film I like so far is my old Tech Pan stuff. Scala, the few rolls I shot, are scanning beautifully. Even that old PolaChrome stuff scans nice, and the PolaBlue (or whatever it was called) scans nice but the grain is huge. I think my issue is grain more than anything, which I don't like usually, though of course some images look great that I shot with TMY and Delta 3200.

    I might as well try the Freestyle kit the first time around, and go from there. I've no aversion to mixing chems but simplicity might do me well in the first attempts.

    Thanks so kindly for helping me to move forward with this

    Shawn
    I dont you will find grain a problem with something faster like FP4 or Plus-X, but my taste in grain is a bit different than yours. To an extent, I like grain.

    I do find the grain unnoticible at normal viewind distances from the screen. Scanning might give different results, though. I think the contrast of slower films would be a problem with my process unless you're shooting in flat lighting which could use a contrast boost





    Quote Originally Posted by squinonescolon View Post
    I like the simplicity of this process. Where did you learn of it? Also, would you post a picture please?

    I mostly used the Ilford reversal processing PDF and this article ( http://www.angelfire.com/wi/spqrspqr...wreversal.html ). I also did a lot of scouring photography forums like this one and finding recipes and processes. Eventually I did a little experimenting and came up with my process. The process I use is mostly a conglomeration of the ilford pdf and the article I posted.

    I dont have a scanner, so I cant post a scan, but next time I project one of the slides, I'll take a pic of it with my camera that uses the technology that allows me to post on the web
    Last edited by Existing Light; 01-11-2011 at 11:33 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo / brain fart
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  2. #12

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    I believe Kodak makes a reversal kit for its T-Max films.

  3. #13
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tokengirl View Post
    I believe Kodak makes a reversal kit for its T-Max films.
    When I've seen it, it has been stupid expensive. Photoformularly makes an analogous kit for $30 but the raw chems are cheap.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  4. #14

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    Yeah, the kits are expensive. That's the mein reason I skipped using them and went straight for the raw chems. At least with the kits, though, you dont have a stock pile of raw chems if you decide you dont like the process. I'm just now finishing up with the 1 pound bottles of sodium bisulfate and sodium metabisulfite. I still have quite a bit of a 100 gram bottle of potassium permanganate


    Oh, I think I should mention that if you have glycerin in your house, you should probably keep it away from the potassium permanganate. They dont like each other and will cause a fire. Good think I dont use glycerin for anything
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  5. #15

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    I've got some Kodak Precision Line Film LPD4 that supposedly produces a positive image through standard development! I haven't had a chance to play with it yet, but that could be interesting. Its purpose was for masking and for title slides and things (high contrast) and it's orthochromatic so taking normal still pictures with it would be strange at best.

    Duncan

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by dafy View Post
    edit 2: what about my old favourite, PMK Pyro, any thoughts on that for this process?
    I don't think that staining developers would work well with the film, as there could be stain from the negative image that wouldn't be fully bleached, and there is not much silver left in the final image.


    Another suggestion (that I haven't tried yet) is to use a 20g/l sodium sulfide solution as the redeveloper. This removes the need for the light reversal step, and produces sepia-toned images.
    "Panic not my child, the Great Yellow Father has your hand"--Larry Dressler

  7. #17

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    I emailed Freestyle, and saw they have the Kodak kit, too. Nick, I never thought about the adverse affects of the stain. I do seem to recall Photographer's Formulary way back when had a replacement for technidol, maybe that's the way to go. Let's see what Freestyle says, maybe the recommended SPUR will work...or for that matter EL's original suggestion of Dektol

  8. #18
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    From notes I harvested off an old newsgroup (remember them) quite a few years ago:

    REVERSAL DEVELOPMENT OF TMAX FILM

    This is the formula used for reversal of TMax 100 and Tmax 400 film. It
    works well for both 35mm and 120 films. From the Mar/Apr 1988
    issue of Darkroom & Creative Camera Techniques.

    1: FIRST DEVELOPER
    Water at 125 deg. 750 cc
    Metol 2 grams
    Sodium Sulfite, Anhydrous 100 grams
    Hydroquinone 5 grams
    Sodium Carbonate, Monohydrate 60 grams
    Sodium Thiosulfate, Pentahydrate 16 grams
    Potassium Bromide 4 grams
    Cold water to make 1 liter
    Develop 10 min @ 68deg - Constant gentle agitation.
    Use once and discard.
    NOTE: If you do not wish to mix this, you may use Kodak D76 or Ilford ID11+
    Adding: 15 grams Sodium Carbonate
    4 grams Sodium Thiosulfate
    1 gram Potassium Bromide
    Per 250ml for each roll

    2: WASH 2 Minutes - Running water.

    3: BLEACH
    Potassium Dichromate 9.5 grams
    Sulphuric Acid 12 cc
    Agitate 3 minutes. After 3 minutes the light may be turned on and the
    remainder of the process can be done in white light.

    4: WASH IN RUNNING WATER 3 MINUTES.

    5: CLEARING BATH
    Water 1000 cc
    Sodium Sulfite, Desiccated 50 grams
    Agitate for 1 minute.

    6: RINSE IN WATER 2 MINUTES

    7: REEXPOSURE TO LIGHT.
    Expose film to white light of a Photoflood bulb in a
    reflector at 5 feet for 2 minutes. Film may remain on the reel.
    Rotate reel to insure complete coverage of film by light.
    Do not use sunlight.

    8: REDEVELOPMENT, Second Developer
    Dektol 1:2 for 3 minutes

    9: WASH 3 MINUTES.

    10: FIX 5 minutes in regular hardening fixer.

    11: HYPO CLEAR, WASH and DRY as usual.

    NOTES: The time for First Development should be thought of as a starting
    point. The First Development is the most critical part, so try to keep all
    the variables, time and temprature, as constant as possible. Expose and
    develop a test roll or two of film to arrive at a time and exposure index that
    is suitable for your system. Overexposure will result in thin slides lacking
    in density, and underexposure will do the opposite. TMax 100 and TMax 400
    can be rated at about its full speed but will have to be customized for your
    conditions.

    In order to obtain Sepia toned slides, instead of the Dektol, the Second
    Developer may be composed of 2 grams per liter of SODIUM SULFIDE. (Not
    Sulfite.)
    my real name, imagine that.

  9. #19
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    8: REDEVELOPMENT, Second Developer Dektol 1:2 for 3 minutes


    Both the OP an this recipe use Dektol. What is so special about Dektol? At the second develop stage shouldn't any developer capable of reducing Silver Halides work?
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  10. #20
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Want high strength high contrast developer to build the d-max needed, which I uunderstand is higher than normal for a negative when you project a positive. I anm not aware of any reduction with Dektol; the bromide here is a modest restrianer, and Dektol D72 published formula it is rather low in sulfite.
    my real name, imagine that.

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