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  1. #31

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    I am familiar with the trick of rewinding and swapping films and reloading using a 2 frame buffer. Done it before with success. Thanks again.
    That's vastly easier than messing around with wet film in the dark. Or adding a changing bag, tank and a knife to the carry around kit, or instant access to a darkroom.
    All you need is a decent pen that can write on the leader.

    As for the Exacta with it's built-in cutter, I've only used the camera a couple of times, never used the cutter feature, and haven't tried one of the old style canisters in it, though I have an old Leica one.
    I'm happy to post some pics of the camera though in a new thread though.

    My understanding of how it works is that you pull the cutter which separates the film, then in the dark, open the camera pull off the cut portion and load it in a tank. Then you respool the remaining film onto the take-up spool. So far as I know, using a Leica cassete wouldn't change anything in the procedure. The cutter is on the right side of the film gate near the take-up spool. So when the film is cut you end up with a leader sized protion out of the cassette.

  2. #32
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    As for the Exacta with it's built-in cutter, I've only used the camera a couple of times, never used the cutter feature, and haven't tried one of the old style canisters in it, though I have an old Leica one.
    I'm happy to post some pics of the camera though in a new thread though.

    My understanding of how it works is that you pull the cutter which separates the film, then in the dark, open the camera pull off the cut portion and load it in a tank. Then you respool the remaining film onto the take-up spool. So far as I know, using a Leica cassete wouldn't change anything in the procedure. The cutter is on the right side of the film gate near the take-up spool. So when the film is cut you end up with a leader sized protion out of the cassette.


    That sounds interesting.

    I have a pair of canisters from an FSU Kiev that one can either load both canisters and use a take up spool rewinding at the end.

    Or, supposedly, you can wind from one into the other just winding totally off the supply spool. But I have never tried it. If it works seems like it would be a good strategy for something with a cutter inside.
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 01-17-2011 at 09:17 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  3. #33

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    The film in the BTZS video has been developed and stopped
    If I'm not mistaken it hasn't been stopped.

  4. #34
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    Digital cameras are sensitive to IR. Convince yourself by looking at the TV remote with one. A good way to check if its batteries are OK.

    With a bank of IR LEDs as a light source you could check the film in the dark and not expose it. It may need a hood over the screen to stop light splashing around the room so a hood over it would be in order. I have seen kids' digitals for $30 and you could dedicate one with a hood fixed permanently just for the purpose. Maybe even a head band to hold it and leave both hands free.
    How's that for left field? :-)

  5. #35
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Here's someone who has tried it!

    Quote Originally Posted by BetterSense View Post
    I have early-generation Eyeclops toy goggles. I had to put a reading-glasses lens over the camera to achieve close focus. I think I paid $60 for them; I was just at Radioshack last night and saw they had a newer flavor on sale for $25. I haven't noticed any film fogging. They are mostly good for DBI of sheet film and finding things that I dropped on the darkroom floor. It's easy enough to load film reels or film holders without them, though.
    Thread: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum43/8...-timers-3.html
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
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    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  6. #36
    CBG
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    If you really must open up the film to cut it in two lengths - you need to have a plan in place before you develop that roll. Don't cut wet film if you don't have to. And there is no need to do it if you know approximately where to cut before you turn the lights out. It is better to do the cut before the film is wet, since wet film is slippery and fragile. But to work prior to development, you will need to know where to cut without looking. You will need a "feel in the dark" marking system that will guide you, and that's not hard to do.

    You'll need to take a developed fixed and dried, but not yet cut roll of film - best if from the same camera - and use it as a "ruler" to make some sort of template in your darkroom, that you can later use in the dark to cut where you need the cut.

    I'm going to say, for illustration here, that you are shooting a 36 exposure roll, and that you want the first 20 frames to be developed one way, and the remainder some other way. Use your ruler to make a cut mark at maybe the 22nd frame since you'll never get it exactly, and better to waste a few frames than to cut a good negative. Murphy's law says that the best frame you have ever shot will be right where you cut if you try to finesse it too much.

    The uncut roll functions merely as a measuring device you use in the light, giving you a length from the place your working roll starts to whatever frame you want to cut at. Take your "ruler roll" and hold it against your workbench, and use maybe pieces of cardboard taped to the bench, or some other item you will later be reliably able to feel in the dark.

    Don't try to measure exactly when you are cutting the roll that wants differing development. Sacrifice a few frames so there's a big enough blank in the middle of the roll that you won't cut a good frame by mistake.

    Make your cut mark at frame 22 perhaps.

    When you are changing exposure / development mid roll, make note at what frame you stop wanting the first development time. Wind several frames past that point. I'd go at least four, six wouldn't seem excessive either, and then start shooting with your new set of images.

    You will need to remember not to switch ends of the film before cutting.

    Does all this make sense?

  7. #37
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    I wonder what stand development with Rodinal at 1:150 for 2 hours would do? I have done multiple reels with different ISO's at 1:100 for an hour but always different reels were different ISO's not different ISO's on the same spool.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  8. #38
    michaelbsc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Kehler
    I wonder what stand development with Rodinal at 1:150 for 2 hours would do? I have done multiple reels with different ISO\\\'s at 1:100 for an hour but always different reels were different ISO\\\'s not different ISO\\\'s on the same spool.
    How would it matter if it is different reels or both exposures on the same reel.





    The liquid doesn\\\'t know which little piece of film is which. So long as you stayed within the boundaries of what you consider acceptable EV ratings with Rodinol stand development you could shoot 5 different speeds on a single roll.
    Last edited by michaelbsc; 01-17-2011 at 08:32 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

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