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  1. #1

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    Safe to remove film from tank before fixing?

    Can a roll be removed from its tank and reel after development and stop bath (but *before* fixing), be cut into two lengths, and then one of the lengths be put back onto a reel and developed further (because it was exposed drastically differently)?
    I guess the real question is: can a developed reel be safely removed from a processing tank before fixing? I have a screw-in red safety light if needed. I will eventually fix all lengths of course, within 30 minutes.
    Probably a silly question, I know. But it’s my first post.
    Using TX400, D-76 (Adonol next), water stop, and Rapid Fixer, btw.

    Thanks,
    Hank

  2. #2
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    If you plan on continuing development, then all of this must be done in complete darkness and rinse off the film you plan on developing further to remove any residual stop bath.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  3. #3

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    How will you know where to cut in complete darkness?

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by domaz View Post
    How will you know where to cut in complete darkness?
    yeah, I was hoping that with a bit of light, i could see where the exposure setting changed during development and snip it there.

    Greg & Domaz: would the safe light help?

  5. #5
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    No, any light that hits the film will expose the undeveloped silver which will then be developed the second time. A safelight will not protect the film.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Davis View Post
    No, any light that hits the film will expose the undeveloped silver which will then be developed the second time. A safelight will not protect the film.
    OK, not a biggie. I just wanted to know if it could be done while seeing the film (to know where to cut).
    Thank you Greg, and Domaz.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by hankthetank View Post
    OK, not a biggie. I just wanted to know if it could be done while seeing the film (to know where to cut).
    Thank you Greg, and Domaz.
    Try this at the risk of your film, and don't blame me if it wrecks your test. But you can try using the IR goggles that paint ball shooters use.

    "Most" film isn't sensitive to IR, but I can't tell you whatever you're using won't be.

    Nor can I state that the toy IR goggles don't bleed light into the red portion of the spectrum. I know the very bright IR LEDs for security cameras have a characteristic red glow at night.

    But if you try it, please do let us know how it works.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  8. #8

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    [QUOTE=michaelbsc;1121932]Try this at the risk of your film, and don't blame me if it wrecks your test. But you can try using the IR goggles that paint ball shooters use.

    "Most" film isn't sensitive to IR, but I can't tell you whatever you're using won't be.

    Christ, there's something out of left field; never would have thought of that. The "night vision" head pieces worn by too-serious paintballers start at about US$260 (quick search). Then there's "how to make cheap thermal goggles" here: http://www.ehow.com/how_5625485_make...l-goggles.html

    A useful idea to try, when and if I have the time. For now I'll stick to a single ISO per roll of film.

  9. #9
    23mjm's Avatar
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    Watch this start at about the 4 minute point. Should answer your question. Seems to work for him. Scares the hell out of me but it's good to know.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0WaD...layer_embedded

  10. #10
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    And while you are cutting the film in half in the dark, please explain exactly how you will execute the cut without cutting an image?

    Anyway, why are your going through all this when the film is already presumably safe in the tank?

    Is what you are smoking or taking legal Down Under?

    Jus' jerkin' your chain!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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