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Thread: Efke Newbie

  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    Re: 2F/2F's #3 point - So would a plastic film squeegee be safe to use on the film when it's time to dry?

    I bought some Kodafix solution today, which I'm told is a hardening fixer. But I was also told that I can't use it with TMax or Ilford Delta films, as they are pre-hardened more than most other modern emulsions. Can anyone verify or refute this?
    Do not use a squeegee on any portion of the film that has emulsion or an image - scratches are likely!

    A hardening fixer works fine with TMax or Delta films - you just have to be sure that they are well washed. I use a wash aid like Hypo Clearing agent for all my films, and would recommend it particularly for those who use hardening fixer.

    Most likely you don't want to use a hardening fixer for prints, especially if you want to tone them.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    I use a wash aid like Hypo Clearing agent for all my films, and would recommend it particularly for those who use hardening fixer.
    This is actually the first recommendation I've received for using a hypo clearing agent for film. Thus far I've heard that it's unnecessary for anything other than fiber prints.

    Any way to tell whether my past films have residual fixer on them?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
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  3. #23
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Georg;

    Please explain ortho-panchromatic.

    Thanks.

    PE

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    This is actually the first recommendation I've received for using a hypo clearing agent for film. Thus far I've heard that it's unnecessary for anything other than fiber prints.

    Any way to tell whether my past films have residual fixer on them?
    You may find the test results in this thread informative:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/8...hing-test.html

    The Kodak publications all tend to recommend HCA, as the alternative that saves time and water.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Georg;

    Please explain ortho-panchromatic.

    Thanks.

    PE
    ortho-panchromatic is telling us that the manufacturer ran out of red sensitizing dye
    Typical examples of ortho-panchromatic are Fuji Neopan Acros 100, Adox CMS 20 and whoever join
    Let the attached spectral sensitivity curves comparison do rest of the talk
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails comp.jpg  
    Regards,
    Georg

  6. #26

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    Also, here is one daytime shot using Adox CMS 20 + Yellow filter.
    Wanna bet that with panchromatic film + Yellow filter it will look way too flat?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Scan-101225-0031.jpg  
    Regards,
    Georg

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    ortho-panchromatic is telling us that the manufacturer ran out of red sensitizing dye
    Typical examples of ortho-panchromatic are Fuji Neopan Acros 100, Adox CMS 20 and whoever join
    Let the attached spectral sensitivity curves comparison do rest of the talk
    Thanks.

    At Kodak we would be more precise using the terms short red pan sensitized or long green ortho, so that the term was clearer (I hope) than this one.

    PE

  8. #28

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    You are welcome!
    Yes, it might be clearer saying short red pan sensitized but orthopanchromatic is what those manufacturers decided to use.
    I quoted what those folks at Fuji and Adox writes in their Tech data pdfs, the Kodak and Agfa curve graphs are there for the sake of comparison - if possible
    However, I highly doubt that somebody tested all of those various films under same circumstances.
    Regards,
    Georg

  9. #29
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    At Kodak we would be more precise using the terms short red pan sensitized or long green ortho, so that the term was clearer (I hope) than this one.
    What did you call Technical Pan instead of "Superpanchromatic"?
    J. Patric Dahlén

  10. #30

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    I've always liked Adox/Efke films. The 50 and 100 speeds are all I've been shooting in 120 the past year. I pre-soak for a minute and use Rodinal 1+100. I use standard agitation. I don't use a hardening fix (I use TF-4). Just handle the wet film with extreme care as one should with any film. They produce great look prints. They don't recommend over exposing these films. I never could figure out why but I seem to do OK rating them at have the speed. How else am I going to get adequate shadow detail?

    Now then for a couple of issues I don't care for. On a few of my rolls the first frame was so close to the end of the roll that I almost had to clip the film hanger into the image itself. I hope Adox have fixed this. I recall reading another user experienced the same thing. I've also seen what appears to be pin holes in a few images but I cannot be certain. I have not yet been able to get into a darkroom to print for awhile. Yet they appear to be tiny white specks. On one roll I took several frames of the same scene and there's a speck in one part on one frame but it's not there on the other three. Odd...

    Pan F+ is a wonderful film...can't go wrong with it. I also rate this at 25 and soup in Rodinal. I find the Adox/Efke 50 to be a tad sharper. I never really like Fp4. After I ran out of Agfa APX 100 Adox 100 was the only medium speed film I liked.

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