Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,723   Posts: 1,515,021   Online: 1219
      
Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 55

Thread: Efke Newbie

  1. #41
    yeknom02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    State College, PA, United States
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    5
    Yep, all the emulsions I listed in the first post I got from going to Freestyle's b&w film page.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

  2. #42

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    256
    Images
    29
    Thanks for the reply George16nik. I actually have been using distilled water for the past six years - as long as I've been developing. Every step of the process I use distilled water except for the wash which is my tap water. I haven't seen these occasional specks on the other films I use.
    PS - anyone know why one is not to over expose these films. I've always been curious.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    650
    Images
    15
    You are welcome!
    Washing of the film is important to be done with filtered or distilled water.
    Otherwise, the emulsion will soak with the dirt from the unfiltered tap water, at least that was in my case, a very long time ago, thou.

    Good luck
    Regards,
    Georg

  4. #44
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,155
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    432
    To revive another topic in this thread, do NOT be afraid of Pyro developers. Respectful, but not afraid. If you're worried about it, just wear nitrile gloves you can get cheaply at the drugstore while processing. Especially with a film like Efke, a pyro developer will be a big help. With a pyro developer, use a non-hardening fixer (the hardening agent will remove some of the stain, and you want the stain) and a water stop.

  5. #45

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    650
    Images
    15
    Yes, Pyro + Efke is beautiful!
    Wearing hand gloves + protection mask for your face is a must, no mater what kind of developer or chemistry You use.
    Almost all the developers, fixers etc. could cause skin irritation, allergy symptoms etc.
    If You can't drink it - its toxic
    Regards,
    Georg

  6. #46
    yeknom02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    State College, PA, United States
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    5
    I guess you raise a question about Pyro - why is stain advantageous? And what are the sharpness characteristics of Pyro?

    When shopping for Pyro, I assume I'm looking for "PMK"? Is it mixed from a powder or liquid?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

  7. #47
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,155
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    432
    The stain is proportional to the exposure, so the denser the silver, the denser the stain. When you first develop negatives in pyro, they'll actually LOOK grainier than you're used to, but when you print them, they'll actually be less grainy. The stain helps mask film grain, and it also provides additional contrast and tonal separation in your highlights. This highlight density boost is even more important when working with alternative processes, some of which need a contrast range beyond what a non-staining developer can produce.

    PMK is one variety of pyro. I personally prefer Pyrocat HD for several reasons. PMK oxidizes very quickly and so it is not suitable for use with rotary processing machines. I develop my film in a Jobo CPP2+, because I can't for the life of me tray process film without scratching it, and I don't like mixing up 4.5 gallons of developer at a time to use my 8x10 deep tanks. If you really want to, you can buy pyro developer kits in powder form and mix it all yourself. PMK also has a greater speed loss than Pyrocat HD - PMK requires you to give at least one extra stop of exposure, whereas Pyrocat will actually give a slight speed increase in many cases (1/2 stop +/-). My preference is to buy the liquid concentrate (most pyro developers are a two-part developer) and then just mix enough working strength solution at the time of development. I'm very partial to the Bostick & Sullivan Pyrocat HD kits - the Part A solution comes already mixed, but dry, and the Part B is liquid. Just follow the directions for adding water to Part A when the kit arrives and then you're good to go. There are oodles of pyro developer formulas out there - if you're interested in trying one, I'd say start with Pyrocat HD because it's easy, economical, and there are a LOT of people using it now so if you need support it's easy to get. Once you get the hang of it, try some of the other formulas to see what they do differently.
    Last edited by TheFlyingCamera; 01-24-2011 at 09:25 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #48
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,092
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    PMK is one variety of pyro. I personally prefer Pyrocat HD for several reasons. PMK oxidizes very quickly and so it is not suitable for use with rotary processing machines. I develop my film in a Jobo CPP2+, because I can't for the life of me tray process film without scratching it,.... PMK also has a greater speed loss than Pyrocat HD - PMK requires you to give at least one extra stop of exposure, whereas Pyrocat will actually give a slight speed increase in many cases (1/2 stop +/-). .... (directions deleted)
    I use a rotary processor too, (Phototherm) and I have avoided Pyro in the past.

    I take it from your descriptions that you find it not only acceptable, but actively use it? I too find tray processing impossible to pull off.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  9. #49
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,155
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    432
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    I use a rotary processor too, (Phototherm) and I have avoided Pyro in the past.

    I take it from your descriptions that you find it not only acceptable, but actively use it? I too find tray processing impossible to pull off.
    Yes, I use Pyrocat HD in my Jobo CPP2+ all the time with every size of film I shoot from 4x5 to 14x17. The trick is to run the processor at the slowest possible speed so as to not accelerate developer oxidation.

  10. #50
    yeknom02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    State College, PA, United States
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    5
    Is Pyro acceptable to use in your standard developing tank, such as a Paterson? What precautions should you take when working with it, and would I have to worry about it staining my sink or tub?
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin