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  1. #21

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    Les and Ed, I am trying to get my head around this. Are you saying what might have happened to toms film is like a Sabatier(SP) effect on a print?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #22

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    are you trying to develope color film in a B&W chemistry? Perhaps you shoot the C41 B&W? It doesn't make any sence that it wouldn't clear. Check the text by the edge to see if infact you are developing B&W film?

  3. #23

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    if it is dichrilic fog - it will have a metalic green sheen to it when you tilt the emulsion to the light. another way to remove it is by making some farmers reducer, after you mix the pt 1+2 together as directed, dunk your film in it. take it out in 15 seconds, wash it, and inspect it. you may have to repeat this a few times, or you can do a clip test with a piece of the film you don't need to see how long it takes to reduce your density enough to get a print out of the negatives.

    i had a similar problem when kodak came out with tmax developer. i was processing 4x5 film in hangers/tanks and was given bad advise from the people at kodak. i was told to use the regular tmax, instead of what i should have used ( tmax RS ). after processing my film i had a dense fog on the base - metalic green and the negatives were virtually bullet-proof. (aside from the fog ) the image on the film gave the same effect as a very thin negative that you can tilt to the light and get a postive image.

    i called the folks at kodak up ( again ), THEY told me i was outta luck and better just throw away the film. it was paul krot, the founder of sprint systems here in rhode island that told me to mix up the farmers reducer ( with his fixer of course! ) and it salvaged the film. when i called kodak back and told them a remedy for the problem ( considering they had given the bad advice twice! ) i also mentioned the person who i had talked with - and of course they told me there was never anyone by that name that worked at kodak
    Last edited by jd callow; 02-08-2007 at 07:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #24

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    This one is a bit of a twister...at first I thought it was probably faulty developer, but then you said you clipped a piece of leader before it went through any chemicals, and it still wouldn't clear in fixer. Inadverdant exposure to light during loading might contribute to the sabatiere effect, but it wouldn't produce fog like you describe. There's not many options left; it looks like you had faulty film. Incidentally, please don't fix film for 5 minutes - you lose your highlights! 2 minutes is more than enough. If you want to get rid of the extra dye in tabular grain films, prolonged fixing is not the best way - extra washing will do the trick ( or better still, let the film sit in 2/3 water baths for a while, then wash again) Good luck!

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Hogan
    This one is a bit of a twister...at first I thought it was probably faulty developer, but then you said you clipped a piece of leader before it went through any chemicals, and it still wouldn't clear in fixer. Inadverdant exposure to light during loading might contribute to the sabatiere effect, but it wouldn't produce fog like you describe. There's not many options left; it looks like you had faulty film. Incidentally, please don't fix film for 5 minutes - you lose your highlights! 2 minutes is more than enough. If you want to get rid of the extra dye in tabular grain films, prolonged fixing is not the best way - extra washing will do the trick ( or better still, let the film sit in 2/3 water baths for a while, then wash again) Good luck!
    Yes, normally 2 minutes is enough...however, this time I went to 5 in a vain attempt to clear it, but to no avail. I still have no idea at all what has happened!

  6. #26

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    It sounds like either:

    1. the film is mislabelled, or

    2. the anitihalation layer hasn't dissolved;

    3. since 35mm Delta 400 isn't supposed to have an anti-halation backing, maybe it's mislabelled and the anti-halation layer hasn't dissolved.

    Try scraping the back of the developed leader (or a frame you don't care about). If you can scrape through to a clear base, then it's definitely a backing. Can you read along the edge to to confirm the film type?

    Having it look like a positive doesn't mean it is a positive. A negative with glancing light with a dark background appears as a positive. The density reflects light whereas the clear part absorbs (or allows the light to pass through), so it looks like a positive.

    Charlie.

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