Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,760   Posts: 1,516,044   Online: 894
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32
  1. #1
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    734
    Images
    19

    hp5, hc110 dilution h problem

    I am going to run some tests soon but there was something wrong and I hope the fellow apugers can help me out.

    I shot a roll of hp5 at iso 640.

    Developed it in hc110 dilution h for 15 mins at 20c, which the recommended time for dilution b is 7.5 minutes at 20c for hp5 at 800, I doubled that time to get the time for dilution h.

    The agitation was once every minute.

    The negatives that I got were very light, or very un dense.

    The thing that I can’t understand is how could the negatives come out so light/un dense when I shot it a 640 and developed with a common time for iso 800. The negatives should be denser.

    Here is a straight scan, I did not let the scanner do anything.



    Any hints or help would be great, thank you.

    I would using a incident meter and was metering for the bright side of the face to get acceptable shutter speeds. Would that been enough to make the negatives this un dense? I hope the problem was my metering because hc 110 is very nice to use.
    Last edited by cjbecker; 02-10-2011 at 10:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Why did you use dilution H? Don't use low dilutions for push processing. Also make sure that you use the minimum recommended HC-110 per roll which is 6mL of concentrate which means dilution B for 35mm processing most of the time. You can get away with a 120 roll at dilution H because you end up with the same amount in 500mL of working solution but with just 250mL of working solution, dilution H is too low for one roll of 35mm film, not enough developer especially for push processing.

    Generally dilution B is recommended for pushing or dilution A for really hard pushes.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,154
    Images
    288
    It seems you are not in natural lighting, but rather artificial lighting, in which case the film speed is actually lowered.

    In order to get an accurate assessment of what has gone wrong, shoot a roll outdoors in broad daylight, using the Sunny 16 rule.
    So, roughly 1/500th second exposure at f/16, which would equate to an exposure index of 500.

    Then develop it, and please take hpulley's comments above seriously, about having enough HC-110 concentrate for each roll of film. It is important.

    If you still don't have enough density and highlight brightness, you need to develop the film longer, regardless of what other people recommend.
    It isn't likely to be a shutter problem, because I have never heard of a shutter that is significantly FASTER than the stated shutter speed, causing underexposure.
    It could also be a metering problem, which is why I am suggesting using the Sunny 16 rule above, to take that aspect out of the equation.

    Good luck.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    734
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Why did you use dilution H? Don't use low dilutions for push processing. Also make sure that you use the minimum recommended HC-110 per roll which is 6mL of concentrate which means dilution B for 35mm processing most of the time. You can get away with a 120 roll at dilution H because you end up with the same amount in 500mL of working solution but with just 250mL of working solution, dilution H is too low for one roll of 35mm film, not enough developer especially for push processing.

    Generally dilution B is recommended for pushing or dilution A for really hard pushes.
    I was shooting 120. My mix was almost 600 parts water and 9.4 parts hc110.

    Also I did not know pushing was not good with dilution h, I will try using the dilutions b and a.

    The reason that I used dilution h was to get longer developing times.

  5. #5
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    734
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    It seems you are not in natural lighting, but rather artificial lighting, in which case the film speed is actually lowered.

    In order to get an accurate assessment of what has gone wrong, shoot a roll outdoors in broad daylight, using the Sunny 16 rule.
    So, roughly 1/500th second exposure at f/16, which would equate to an exposure index of 500.

    Then develop it, and please take hpulley's comments above seriously, about having enough HC-110 concentrate for each roll of film. It is important.

    If you still don't have enough density and highlight brightness, you need to develop the film longer, regardless of what other people recommend.
    It isn't likely to be a shutter problem, because I have never heard of a shutter that is significantly FASTER than the stated shutter speed, causing underexposure.
    It could also be a metering problem, which is why I am suggesting using the Sunny 16 rule above, to take that aspect out of the equation.

    Good luck.

    - Thomas
    Yes I was indoors.

    Also I will give what you said a try about eliminating the meter and try shooting some outside.

  6. #6
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,411
    Images
    2
    Sorry, kind of unrelated, but can someone tell me I'm not crazy?

    Dilution A is 1:15, B is 1:31, C is 1:19 and D is 1:39. Ok, why would Kodak choose to arbitrarily make C more concentrated than B? Am I going insane or is Kodak?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  7. #7
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by cjbecker View Post
    I was shooting 120. My mix was almost 600 parts water and 9.4 parts hc110.

    Also I did not know pushing was not good with dilution h, I will try using the dilutions b and a.

    The reason that I used dilution h was to get longer developing times.
    7.5 minutes is a decent amount of time. Less than 5 minutes is not ideal.

    What agitation were you using? I use 4 inversions every minute during the first 10s including the first minute.

    Check the film leader too, is it dense or thin? How old is your HC-110? Stored as concentrate or stock? Full bottle or half empty?
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  8. #8
    cjbecker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    IN
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    734
    Images
    19
    I was shooting 120 so there was no leader.

    The hc110 is half full, kept at concentrate and is under 1 year old.

    I agitation was consistant for first 15 seconds and then one twist every minute.

  9. #9
    hpulley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Guelph, Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,214
    Images
    75
    Duh, of course no leader. Sorry... were there any bright highlights like interior lamps in shots that should have been at D-max? If so, are they dense as they should be or also thin?

    I think more agitation is needed. 10s per minute is recommended by Ilford.

    Kept as concentrate HC-110 should last forever so I doubt that was it. Should have been enough HC-110 for a 120 roll. Try more agitation, dilution B and if those still fail to give you the results you need then it could be that the metering was fooled by interior lights and you underexposed the scenes.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

    Happiness is...

  10. #10
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,154
    Images
    288
    I too am fairly convinced it's underexposure, but possibly in combination with under-development, since it's just dark all over without any bright highlights.

    I would check exposure before checking development though. One thing at a time to get to the bottom of what the problem actually is. Just to make sure we are not addressing the symptoms, but rather the problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by hpulley View Post
    Duh, of course no leader. Sorry... were there any bright highlights like interior lamps in shots that should have been at D-max? If so, are they dense as they should be or also thin?

    I think more agitation is needed. 10s per minute is recommended by Ilford.

    Kept as concentrate HC-110 should last forever so I doubt that was it. Should have been enough HC-110 for a 120 roll. Try more agitation, dilution B and if those still fail to give you the results you need then it could be that the metering was fooled by interior lights and you underexposed the scenes.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin