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  1. #21
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    I read Kevin's post and thought: 'yes'. I know AA proposed, or better talked about, the microwave to speed things up. I tried it and use it ever since, but I don't think he ever said that it would solve the dry-down issue. I actually tested several methods of drying a print (ambient air, forced air, heated drum, infrared, microwave and UV). There are some differences in print surface texture and image color, but they all 'suffer' from about the same amount of dry down.
    I'm sorry Ralph. I guess I stated it wrong. You're right, it doesn't solve the drydown factor but it lets you see a dried test strip so therefor you don't have to worry about drydown.

  2. #22
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    ... it doesn't solve the drydown factor but it lets you see a dried test strip so therefor you don't have to worry about drydown.
    That's true, and that's what makes it a valuable method. However, one need to be aware, print 'color' and gloss may be slightly different compared to the final print.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
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  3. #23
    Mats_A's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ralnphot View Post
    I send all my test strips that look decent to our public library to hand out as book markers. My daughter punches a hole on one end and loops a piece of ribbon or string with a tassle on them for decoration. I have hundreds of pieces of my photos floating around town.
    Great idea! I will ask our library if they are interested in this.

    r

    Mats
    Digital is for communication, film is for documentation.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiopirilo

  4. #24
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Take a handfull of them in with you to hand out. Its a neat feeling to see them go out with strangers.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  5. #25

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    Hi,

    If you figure out the printing exposure for a properly exposed negative, and make standardized proofsheets, you will get very close to the right exposure right off the bat, just by examining your contact sheets. I don't mess with the stepped test strips any more. I just do trimmed-down pieces of paper at a single time. It also eliminates any error that may be introduced by hitting your enlarger timer multiple times for the strip instead of just once for the print.

    I do fix my test strips for about a minute, and rinse them so that I can handle them without getting fixer on my fingers. While I do not dry them, I do at least squeegee them with a dedicated squeegee. I've tried the microwave method, and it really doesn't save much time IMO. Also, we all know that you are not supposed to microwave metal, right?
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  6. #26
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    That's true, and that's what makes it a valuable method. However, one need to be aware, print 'color' and gloss may be slightly different compared to the final print.
    This is absolutely true. Prints dried in the microwave tend to be warmer and very much glossier, but this is simply ignored.

  7. #27
    MattKing's Avatar
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    A hair dryer works well with RC prints.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #28

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    I've been noticing, (with RC prints) dry down effects sort of take two steps. There is a change from wet to dry and from dry to completely dry... I usually dry mine to a point it feels dry to touch - front and back before making exposure judgment. Recently, I've been noticing the print looks different few hours later - almost as if it continued to dry. Am I seeing real change or is this something psychological?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #29
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    I've been noticing the [RC] print looks different few hours later - almost as if it continued to dry. Am I seeing real change or is this something psychological?
    RC papers, especially glossy ones, often have a 'veil' that obscures the deep shadows. Changing the angle of light can reduce or accentuate the veiling. Sometimes heating the print for a few minutes in a print dryer can reduce the veil.

    Kodak's RC papers had the problem in spades, Agfa's would exhibit it but you had to look, Ilford's RC papers have very little veiling.

    You don't mention the paper you are using, but I wouldn't be surprised if you found the level of veiling changing in the hours after drying.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
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    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  10. #30
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The veiling is usually micro reticulation of the gelatin super coat caused by big temperature variations. If it occurs it can be cured by steaming the print surface.

    Ian


    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    RC papers, especially glossy ones, often have a 'veil' that obscures the deep shadows. Changing the angle of light can reduce or accentuate the veiling. Sometimes heating the print for a few minutes in a print dryer can reduce the veil.

    Kodak's RC papers had the problem in spades, Agfa's would exhibit it but you had to look, Ilford's RC papers have very little veiling.

    You don't mention the paper you are using, but I wouldn't be surprised if you found the level of veiling changing in the hours after drying.

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