Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,209   Posts: 1,531,957   Online: 1152
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35
  1. #1
    Mats_A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Finland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    571
    Images
    10

    Things I learned in my darkroom I wished I knew before.

    Item # 382: Ilford over the lens filters are not washable. Or to be more precise, they are not soakable (is that a word?). They delaminate....

    On the bright side the prints came out OK. But to be honest, with the rate I'm burning through test strips, the price of the Analyser Pro starts to look more and more appealing.

    r

    Mats
    Digital is for communication, film is for documentation.


    http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiopirilo

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,855
    Images
    32
    Mats, all you need is an Ilford EM-10 and establish a base exposure for your paper. Then set up your negative exposure as close as possible to that, and you should only need one or two test exposures to dial in your print. EM-10's can be had for cheap these days.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  3. #3
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,436
    Images
    1
    Darkroom meters are a big help in getting to a good work print fast. However, they do not replace the usefulness of final test strips to optimize a fine print.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #4
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,418
    Images
    2
    I'm curious how others do their test strips, but I usually cut up a 5x7" sheet, short ways, into about 1" strips. I develop them and put them in the stop and then turn on the lights and check.

    Some might poo-poo this method, but I used to fix my test strips and it just seemed like a huge waste of time. This has helped me get to a good print much faster.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    123
    What Ralph said. Although I would say "Darkroom Automation" at this point. Nice meter, good system, useful timer.

  6. #6
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,855
    Images
    32
    You are the master Ralph, and I concur. Getting to a good working print shouldn't take up all ones time. It causes far too much frustration otherwise.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    890
    Does no-one else make a contact sheet and use that as their first 'test-strip' ? If you make it repeatable it gives an excellent base-line from which to adjust exposure and, perhaps, contrast. For me, further detailed modifications seem clearer when going visually from a straight work-print, based on the contact sheet result.

    Mats, you could maybe make a ring-around to keep on a board in a handy place. Put a 'correct' print (not extreme in any way I suppose) in the centre and move outwards horizontally and vertically, changing exposure by (for instance) 1/4 stop then 1/2 stops, and contrast by 1/2 grades. It makes it easier to zero in on what you want.

  8. #8
    brian steinberger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    2,331
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    100
    Mats, a few tips. First off, you HAVE to fix your test strips. Half of the normal amount of time in the fixer is fine. I dry mine then in a microwave, this helps compensate for "dry-down." If you don't have access to a microwave you'll have to account for the "dry-down factor." It's usually around 10% less exposure, depending on paper of course. You'll have to run tests.

    As far as test strips, I made myself a test strip printer out of mat-board. I used the plan in the back of the book "Way Beyond Monochome." If you don't have this book I highly recommend it. Get the new edition. The test strip printer plan is on page 472 of the new edition. This printer allows you to use a piece of 5x7 paper to make a test strip of one area, usually your highlight over and over at varying exposures so you can pick the exposure time for your print. Then you can run tests to choose your filter grade from there. I highly, highly recommend this process. It saves me paper and time in the darkroom, and is more accurate than an enlarging meter.

  9. #9
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    the villages .centralflorida,USA and Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,436
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    ... I dry mine then in a microwave, this helps compensate for "dry-down." ...
    Brian

    I must question that. Why do you think so?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  10. #10
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,418
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    First off, you HAVE to fix your test strips.
    I'm not understanding why. For one, I throw away my test strips. 2nd, if there is an any appreciable "clearing" in the fix, it doesn't seem to be significant enough with Ilford MG, in my case.

    I also don't bother to see the test strips dry; you can definitely get an excellent idea of where your exposure and contrast need to be with wet, unfixed test strips.

    Maybe this would make a difference if you're dialing in times within a 1 second range or something, but when it comes to figuring out if you need 5, 10 or 15 seconds, I say stop it and turn on the lights.

    It might not satisfy the ultra particular, but for me it makes my time in the darkroom much more satisfying. I'd rather see prints than strips!

    Anywhoo, that's just my 4¢ (seemed a bit more than just 2)
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin