Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,302   Posts: 1,536,240   Online: 739
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    fhovie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Port Hueneme, California - USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,247
    Images
    92
    My favorites are Stonhenge Rising and Cranes Plainotype - I would think one could get some severly outdated paper off e-bay and fix it out if he wanted to keep the emulsion but loose the silver.

  2. #12
    glbeas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Roswell, Ga. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,307
    Images
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    I am planning on: "hand coating fixed out baryta paper for alt processes"!!!

    Actually, I was hoping to not have to fix it out, but I'll give it a try. Wonder what's tricky about it - getting all the chemicals out properly?

    I found an old post from him with a dead link to this topic. His e-mail also returns unknown. Any idea how to get hold of him? I'd like to get a copy of that booklet if at all possible.

    Thanks for the lead!

    -Mike
    The book makes it out to be the coating step that is the tricky part, that and the fact the paper will absorb a lot of sensitiser. He also said the wash probably needs to be longer. Theres slightly different techniques for glossy and matte paper in the coating too. When you get to your trial runs pm me and I'll share what Ican from the book if you can't get on yourself.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #13
    mikewhi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    808
    Images
    9
    [QUOTE=glbeas]He claims to be able to get an astounding Dmax but the process is tricky, hence writing the manual.
    QUOTE]

    The reason that I want to try this is that ever since playing with Pt\Pd somewhat that I should be able to get an 'amazing' Dmax on this paper compared to the rougher surfaces of appers typicallysed in alt processes. I know people that do this prefer these papers and this look, but I want to try this out.

    If I coat baryta papers with Pt\Pd, I wonder if I'll just end up with AZO?
    That would be pretty funny.....

    -Mike

  4. #14
    mikewhi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Redmond, WA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    808
    Images
    9
    I have a few boxes of old Kodak Elite, which was a very heavy triple weight paper so I'll try that out first......

  5. #15
    gainer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,726
    Images
    2
    Get some outdated photo paper and remove the emulsion. Clorox will do it nicely and completely. It takes off gelatin and all.
    Gadget Gainer

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    [QUOTE=mikewhi]
    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    He claims to be able to get an astounding Dmax but the process is tricky, hence writing the manual.
    QUOTE]

    The reason that I want to try this is that ever since playing with Pt\Pd somewhat that I should be able to get an 'amazing' Dmax on this paper compared to the rougher surfaces of appers typicallysed in alt processes. I know people that do this prefer these papers and this look, but I want to try this out.

    If I coat baryta papers with Pt\Pd, I wonder if I'll just end up with AZO?
    That would be pretty funny.....

    -Mike
    Craig uses Tween as a surfactant to allow the coating to penetrate. Without using it, he says that the coating is uneven. As I recall, the other important factor is temperature during the coating process. I believe that I have a copy of his book around here somewhere.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    270

    Stripped Photographic Papers For Platinum Printing

    Mike,

    I have tested Platinum Printing on various photographic papers with the emulsion removed...

    - results will vary from paper to paper... I have tried Agfa Classic, Kodak PX CD, Ilford MGFB, & Bergger (J&C).
    - Kodak papers have problems with inconsistency in the coating & bleedback.
    - Ilford, intermittent blotching... Under magnification this paper has uneven surface fibres that interfere with image sharpness.
    - I found the Bergger (J&C) papers far superior to all others in terms of paper base colour, ease of coating, attainable Dmax, and most importantly .... sharpness of image detail.
    - The papers seem to have a 'right' side (I clip one corner to identify)
    - Double coating with these papers does make a significant difference.

    A few things to consider when stripping emulsions...

    - Wear gloves and do the emulsion removal outdoors ...the process releases some very nasty toxic fumes!
    - I used a dilution of about 2:1 bleach to water. The gentle use of a soft SYNTHETIC brush will make the removal process go faster without damaging the paper surface. If you use something like a hake the bleach will dissolve the fibres.
    - Keep a bucket handy when doing batches as the solution will exhaust itself and accumulate the clay base which you do not want to reintroduce to the paper (will cause bleedback and reduced Dmax).
    - I washed the paper for about an hour after the bleach (it is important to ensure all the clay is rinsed out as well as the bleach....bleach eats paper, clay kills Dmax) and then gave an oxalic soak to get the pH back up to where it should be. You may want to do the gelatine thing as well.

    I believe that for a high key image rendered with delicacy of tone and sharpness of detail the stripped Bergger is absolutely sublime. I found that using fixed out paper had an assortment of problems including attaining evenness of coating (even with a surficant) and effective clearing.

    Also there is always the option of fixing out the paper and just using the backside.

    Hope this helps..... Annie

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin