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  1. #1

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    Is temperature critical to fiber based paper?

    After years of working with RC paper I want to move to fiber based paper and I want to know if temperature affects the paper. It seems logical that the lower the temperature the longer it would take to develop the paper but I'm only speculating. Is there a variance in quality, grain, richness of whatever when a constant temperature is not maintained?

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Developing times published assume a temperature of 68°F (20°C) according to Kodak's dataguides.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

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  3. #3
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Puma, theory oftentimes is quite different from reality. I have developed BW paper (all kinds) since 1964 and color since 1978. Both have been processed at temps varying from 65 F to 100 F. There is NO VISIBLE DIFFERENCE. PERIOD. Of course higher temps allow shorter dev/fix times and you should NOT develop paper for less than 1 to 1.5 minutes for top consistency. Just a thought. - David Lyga

  4. #4

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    Thank you for your response. I searched all over and never found anything definitive, so I genuinely appreciate your answer.

  5. #5
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    In my limited experience (Ilford and Kentmere FB), results are good anywhere between 20C and 27C and become decidedly poorer (not just slow, it doesn't look as good) at 18C. You should have a google for "factorial development" as a means of determining on a print-to-print basis how long to develop as the temperature changes.

  6. #6

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    My experience is that using Ilford and Arista EDU and Dektol, when it's really cold it tends to be tad slower but development is "completed" (yes, I know, it doesn't really complete) at 60 seconds and 120 seconds respectively. Quite frankly, I really don't think about temperature when doing printing work.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  7. #7
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    From my experience, development tends to become really slow if the temperature drops below 18°C. You should also avoid to use warm water for the final rinse. This might be okay with RC, but with FB, the gelatine will soften and is therefore more prone to scratches and other damages during the washing process. Around 20-25°C will be fine.

    Best, Benjamin

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Metol based MQ developers won't work well below about 18°C, it can be difficult to get a good black. Phenidone based PQ developers work below 18°C but times will be significantly longer.

    With warm-tone papers increasing the temperature can help increase the warmth, but you need to cut the time to compensate.

    In addition too hot/cold a wash, and temperature shifts during processing can have a slight impact on the paper surface/sheen with FB & RC papers, this is often just slight micro reticulation. it's more noticeable with Glossy RC prints. This can usually be corrected by steaming a dried print over a kettle or pan of boiling water for a few seconds, with care not to cook your fingers !!!!!!!!

    Ian

  9. #9

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    You could use cold tone developer at 25 C. and warm tone developer at 15 C. if you wanted to confuse youself. Only joking, but the point is that they would still have effective 'normal' development properties.
    Mark Walker.



 

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