Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,501   Posts: 1,543,344   Online: 883
      
Page 7 of 13 FirstFirst 12345678910111213 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 126
  1. #61

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Austin
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    390
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    Jeff, were you printing on a neutral tone paper for some time before you tried MGWT?
    Yes, MGWT is the only warm tone paper I've tried. I now use LPD (at home) as well as Dektol (community darkroom). Does LPD give a different look than Dektol with this paper. I'll be trying it and I'll be trying selenium toning as well.
    thanks for the help.
    Jeff Glass

    Photo Blog
    Website

  2. #62

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,025
    I'm personally glad of the whiter base. It makes is a brilliant all rounder. There are tonnes of warm papers about even just in the Foma stable, but very few strong middle ground papers. I think it was essential for Ilford to bring this paper into the mainstream and I bet they are selling a lot more of it as a result. If any of you are in London, drop in to see Robin Bell and have a look at some of his prints on this paper. I've printed almost all my Afghanistan project on this and those prints not on this are slowly being reprinted. I printed some on Adox MCC and they are very nice when the paper rebate is hidden by the mount, bec the base is so much brighter. When hidden they look very close however - just warm of neutral.

    For anyone missing the old MGWT, look no further than Foma. You'll get warm, antique, matt, semi matt, stippled and just about all you could wish for within their line. The only thing you wont get is the same top end contrast at the higher end.

  3. #63
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Elk, California
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    2,554
    Images
    33
    For most warm images I now prefer MGIV and a light sepia toning, rather than the Ilford Warmtone.

    Jon
    Mendocino Coast Black and White Photography: www.jonshiu.com

  4. #64

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Austin
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    390
    Images
    11
    Tom brings up an interesting point about MCC 110 from Adox. I find that using this paper in more dilute LPD gives a nice warm tone. Because LPD is so versatile and MCC is receptive to that flexibility, I had decided to just stick with those two unless I want a really warm tone. I guess I'll be testing this theory against MGWT due to this thread.

    I would like to hear from those of you who have used MGWT with LPD, if any.

    Jeff
    Jeff Glass

    Photo Blog
    Website

  5. #65
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,656
    Images
    14
    Has anyone noticed the paper speed or characteristics of Warmtone changing over the last year or two?
    Has anyone noticed an explosion of contrast or increase of contrast when the paper hits the fix?

    Inquiring minds need to know.

    Just been given a project where I need to go through 10 - 50 sheet boxes of 20 x24 inch Warmtone so its back to the darkroom and Buddy Guy, a bit of Madonna when I have to pull out the sensitive side of the negative. I will stink of fix for the next month.

  6. #66
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,286
    Images
    301
    Madonna? Sensitive? Yipes...

    I feel as though MGWT requires more exposure, but I haven't compared directly to prints from years ago. I do notice, as you say, that the blacks get stronger when it hits the fix. Like the picture 'clears'. I didn't think much of it, since I develop the print by time anyway.

    Sounds like a rather large project, Bob! Lots of paper. Both you and Ilford must be happy.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #67
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,264
    Images
    148
    Warmtone papers get colder over time, they didn't before the Cadmium was removed from them. Some shift more than others but I noticed a very significant shift in the Ilford Warmtone I used last November compared to a year or so earlier.

    The increase in contrast (apparent) in fixing is the clearing of the emulsion as the silver halides are dissolved, try it with some film processed in a white tray, switch the light on as soon as it's in the fixer, it'll look flat & milky then as it fixes the contrast increases.

    Ian

  8. #68

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,025
    The speed can sure be an issue for big prints off 35mm. Enter Adox MCC...

    The only trouble I have had with MCC is that when I have a flat neg and need to get the highest contrast possible, it hits the ceiling before the MGWT, which has close to a grade more contrast I would say. Not often necessary, but when it is, its everything. Both have closely matched surface sheens too - handy.

  9. #69
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,656
    Images
    14
    I have not noticed this effect with other papers, or at least not as strong. But the bulk of what I use is Ilford Warmtone.
    I must be getting better seeing in the darkroom. or

    come to think of it the last couple of years I have spent considerable time looking at the print during the development process, somewhat a result of lith printing and my greater desire to see the print appear and figure out dodge burn routines. So in the past I could have been lazy and not noticed this contrast increase in the fixer.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Warmtone papers get colder over time, they didn't before the Cadmium was removed from them. Some shift more than others but I noticed a very significant shift in the Ilford Warmtone I used last November compared to a year or so earlier.

    The increase in contrast (apparent) in fixing is the clearing of the emulsion as the silver halides are dissolved, try it with some film processed in a white tray, switch the light on as soon as it's in the fixer, it'll look flat & milky then as it fixes the contrast increases.

    Ian

  10. #70
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,286
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth View Post
    The only trouble I have had with MCC is that when I have a flat neg and need to get the highest contrast possible, it hits the ceiling before the MGWT, which has close to a grade more contrast I would say. Not often necessary, but when it is, its everything. Both have closely matched surface sheens too - handy.
    That's an interesting observation. I can't remember exactly now, since it's been a few years since I printed on Agfa MCC, but I can't really remember having problems reaching maximum contrast with it.
    Would you say that is a correct observation? If so, the MCC emulsion that ADOX uses is not the same as the old Agfa.

    Anyway, I also agree with your notion that larger prints on MGWT can take a ridiculously long time, entering reciprocity failure territory. My new (to me) Leitz Focomat V35 enlarger only has a 75W bulb in it. Making a 16x20" print the other day I had a main exposure of 120 seconds at f/2.8 on the Focotar lens, and the burning exercises were several minutes long. Fortunately the Focotar is a good lens, which holds up well at f/2.8 even at 16x magnification, but it was definitely a test of my patience.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin