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  1. #1

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    Ilford mfg. code?

    Can anyone point me to info on how to decipher the manufacturing date code on Ilford papers and chemistry?

    The papers are ##X###X##
    The chemistry is ######

    The store that I buy from has a slow turnover rate, so I'm wondering....

  2. #2
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Ilford and Kodak use a similar system. With Ilford, the first two digits represent the manufacturing month. Mar2011 carries the number '78'. Feb2011 was number '77' and so on.

    But keep in mind, properly stored, photographic paper will last for many years! Also, if you are too picky, your local store may not carry paper much longer, and you are stuck with mail order!
    Last edited by RalphLambrecht; 03-05-2011 at 03:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  3. #3
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    We already had a discussion about this a while back. This thread goes very much into the details:

    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum41/6...er-code-3.html

    It´s more essential however, how the paper was stored. Properly stored paper can be fine even 5 years or longer after manufacturing.
    On the other hand, paper that was stored not properly might be fogged even if not older than 2 years. That´s why "best before" dates on papers do not make too much sense.

  4. #4
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    I have used properly stored paper up to 10 years after manufacture. All it lost was a bit of contrast and speed.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #5

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    Thanks - I figured out how to decipher the paper code.

    The chemistry code is more important to me - Ilford states WT developer has a shelf life of 2 years. The six digit code doesn't resemble the paper code, and if the first 2 digits are the date, I just bought a bottle made in '09.

  6. #6
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darkprints View Post
    Thanks - I figured out how to decipher the paper code.

    The chemistry code is more important to me - Ilford states WT developer has a shelf life of 2 years. The six digit code doesn't resemble the paper code, and if the first 2 digits are the date, I just bought a bottle made in '09.
    Yes, the chemistry batch codes also include the date of manufacture in the first two digits just like the paper and film codes. In addition, films are also labeled with an expiration date, which you can safely ignore if the film was refrigerated.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #7

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    `09, now 11. I would not have bought it.

    And paper does not last multiple years, it used to. I have some Medalist exp `69. Works ok. I have 2+year old Ilford paper that has gone bad. The problem is they have added chemicals to speed aging, thus they do not have a years or more worth of paper waiting to go up for sale. Great for them. Downside is it ages just as fast on my shelf as theirs and in a year or two it is GONE.

  8. #8
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec View Post
    ... I have 2+year old Ilford paper that has gone bad. The problem is they have added chemicals to speed aging, thus they do not have a years or more worth of paper waiting to go up for sale. Great for them. Downside is it ages just as fast on my shelf as theirs and in a year or two it is GONE.
    Pretty heavy accusation! What's your source?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec View Post
    `09, now 11. I would not have bought it.
    If I had been able to decipher the code, I would not have bought it. This liquid developer has a shelf life, like milk, and should have an expiration date plainly visible to the consumer - then it would up to the consumer to decide whether to buy it or not.

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Moravec View Post
    `09, now 11. I would not have bought it.

    And paper does not last multiple years, it used to. I have some Medalist exp `69. Works ok. I have 2+year old Ilford paper that has gone bad. The problem is they have added chemicals to speed aging, thus they do not have a years or more worth of paper waiting to go up for sale. Great for them. Downside is it ages just as fast on my shelf as theirs and in a year or two it is GONE.
    Simply not true.

    However all warm tone papers age faster than the older pre 90's versions which had Cadmium in them, but they don't go bad that fast. There will be a slight shift in image colour over 2 or 3 years.

    Ian

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