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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Sorry for the "necro posting" but I just found this thread because I was about to try PanF+ in Diafine. "Shell out for it" is a misnomer when it comes to Diafine. Though it's about $20+ a quart many places and $30 a gallon from Freestyle it lasts almost forever. I used to do upwards of 70 rolls in a quart. Just pour it back in the bottle and keep using it. As long as you keep part B out of part A (easy in practice - carryover the other way happens normally and causes no problems) it just keeps working. Eventually it starts to fade but it's actually a very, very economical developer on a per roll basis.

    So Chris, did you ever try out the combo with Pan F+?
    Tri-X in Diafine is one of my all time favorites for EI 1250 or so.
    I have it in my freestyle basket. I will purchase it at the beginning of the month. I have since perfected my use with this film and Rodinal. I really like this combo in 120 roll film.

    Chris

  2. #22
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kq6up View Post
    I have it in my freestyle basket. I will purchase it at the beginning of the month. I have since perfected my use with this film and Rodinal. I really like this combo in 120 roll film.

    Chris
    Depending on the light over the next few days I may get to shoot some Pan F+ destined for Diafine. If I do, I'll try to remember to report back here.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kq6up View Post
    I have it in my freestyle basket. I will purchase it at the beginning of the month. I have since perfected my use with this film and Rodinal. I really like this combo in 120 roll film.

    Chris
    I just recently got some Rodinal and also have a freezer load of old PanF+ that I never seem to get to. What sort of EI were you using? I was expecting about 25 to be tops and was going to start there. I tried the soup 25+ years ago and the grittiness in 35mm at the time had me moving to other things (ended up with FG7 at the time for many years). I mainly work with MF and LF these days and don't worry so much about grain and am curious about the tonality that others trumpet about their Rodinal use.
    Craig Schroeder

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by craigclu View Post
    I just recently got some Rodinal and also have a freezer load of old PanF+ that I never seem to get to. What sort of EI were you using? I was expecting about 25 to be tops and was going to start there. I tried the soup 25+ years ago and the grittiness in 35mm at the time had me moving to other things (ended up with FG7 at the time for many years). I mainly work with MF and LF these days and don't worry so much about grain and am curious about the tonality that others trumpet about their Rodinal use.
    Yes, if you agitate like normal you will get very harsh gritty looking negs. That was my first experience. However, on ALL Rodinal processing only gets one gentle inversion per minute, and this has reduced the grain across the board. For Pan F+ I took another member's suggestion and only agitate for the first 30" and two GENTLE inversions every 5 minutes. The result is BEAUTIFUL negs with very fine grain. This is all at 1:50 dilution. This agitation scheme has some compensation effect, so rating the film at EI50 is perfect. I have bracketed and found 25 too hot when agitating this way. If you agitate normally (which I don't recommend) I would rate it slower.

    Good Luck,
    Chris Maness

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by kq6up View Post
    For Pan F+ I took another member's suggestion and only agitate for the first 30" and two GENTLE inversions every 5 minutes. The result is BEAUTIFUL negs with very fine grain. This is all at 1:50 dilution.
    Looking at the massive dev chart I see only one entry for 1+50 at EI 50. Do you develop for 11 minutes? If so does that mean you have only 2 inversions at about 5 minutes and 10 minutes?
    pixel is a four letter word

  6. #26

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    You would agitate at the 5, 10, and 15 minute mark. Dump the soup at 18 minutes. The extended time is a result of the sparce agitation.

    Chris

  7. #27

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    Excellent. Thanks!
    pixel is a four letter word

  8. #28

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    Hmmm, I guess I must be in a very small minority that uses Rodinal 1+100 with standard agitation. First of all, I do see a difference in the sharpness of my prints from 1+50 to 1+100. However, I had the misfortune of filling my tank to the brim. So basically, I was stand developing the whole way. I got uneven development along the edges of my negs, both in 120 and 135. Now I fill just enough to cover the reel and I agitate for a full minute and then five quick inversions every thirty seconds. This is with Rodinal 1+100 for 120 Pan F+ and for Acros 100 in 135. What a huge difference!
    Before I go, I'd like to point out the the OP that sharpness and resolution are not the be-all and end-all in photography. Yes, they are important, but one gets to a point where they are splitting hairs. The human eye can only resolve so much. Most films and lenses exceed what even those with the best eyes can see. Ultimately, it comes down to magnification. If you really need off the chart resolution, you need to shoot a bigger negative. I like shooting my 35mm camera very much, as much as I do my Mamiya RZ67. However, I am fully aware and OK with the fact that even with my Zeiss lens on my Nikon F3, my negs will never match those fed through my RZ. There's always trade offs. Happy shooting!

  9. #29
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marcmarc View Post
    Before I go, I'd like to point out the the OP that sharpness and resolution are not the be-all and end-all in photography. Yes, they are important, but one gets to a point where they are splitting hairs. The human eye can only resolve so much. Most films and lenses exceed what even those with the best eyes can see. Ultimately, it comes down to magnification. If you really need off the chart resolution, you need to shoot a bigger negative. I like shooting my 35mm camera very much, as much as I do my Mamiya RZ67. However, I am fully aware and OK with the fact that even with my Zeiss lens on my Nikon F3, my negs will never match those fed through my RZ. There's always trade offs. Happy shooting!
    I would like to split a hair... Resolution comparing 120 and 35mm is a lot closer than you think. Due to limitations in lens design, a good 120 lens will resolve a whole lot less than a comparable 35mm lens, (assuming that you're shooting both lenses to show similar depth of field), to the point that the film itself poses resolution limitations to the 35mm neg, while the lens itself is the limitation of the 120 neg. This was shown some twenty years ago using Hasselblad's test facility in Gothenburg, Sweden, and since then we have a few films that would benefit the 35mm medium even more, like Neopan Acros, and improved TMX.

    What you do get with 120 is better tonal gradation from gray tone to gray tone, and obviously grain will be smaller since you're magnifying less. But resolution can, in some instances actually be better with 35mm equipment than 120. You need an APO enlarging lens to fully release the potential of 35mm negatives, though.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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