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  1. #11
    geraldatwork's Avatar
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    I've been drying my fiber prints using one of those ferro-type/canvas dryers and have been happy getting flat prints. Just for the hell of it I wanted to try air drying. I don't have screens so I squeegeed the prints on each side and placed them face down on my bedroom carpet which has a medium pile height. To be safe I have a real good vacuum and cleaned the area real well. After about an hour or so I gently picked up the prints and put them down again just to make sure they didn't stick to the carpet. (they didn't). Much to my surprise in the morning I had perfectly flat prints. They were even very slightly flatter than those I dried in the dryer.

    I dried half the prints in the dryer and half on the carpet. One thing I think I noticed is that the dryer prints seemed to have very slightly blacker blacks. and possibly had more of a dry down effect like maybe 1 or 2 %.

  2. #12
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by geraldatwork
    I've been drying my fiber prints using one of those ferro-type/canvas dryers and have been happy getting flat prints.
    Do you ever get "rippled" edges using that method? I used one of those for years and that was an occasional problem that I never was able to solve (other than by dry mounting).

    Quote Originally Posted by geraldatwork
    One thing I think I noticed is that the dryer prints seemed to have very slightly blacker blacks. and possibly had more of a dry down effect like maybe 1 or 2 %.
    That lends credence to the theory that dry-down is caused by shrinkage.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  3. #13
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Looks like you have more room than I have David. I have to do all my washing in the kitchen sink. You can get by with four trays of each size. Two for developers or developer/water bath, one for the stop, and one for the first fx. Keeping the prints in a tub of water, I dump and rinse the trays, then cylce through the second fix, toning, and HCA.

    You've got a print washer which is good. I use a couple Rubber Maid dishwashing tubs and the soak/rinse process for washing.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  4. #14

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    I'm goig to start using FB too (5X7). I just read the Ilford FB pdf and they only mention the dev/stop/fix/wash method. I'm sure there's an advanced reason for the two dev method. Why the two fix method? I don't have as much space in my darkroom. It's about 2ft. wide. I have 4 trays I use for my RC adventures. I would need to come up with a way to stack them to add more. I have enough space below my trays for a container of water to collect prints for the trip to the bathroom for washing.
    Someone mentioned drying prints by one corner. I read about this on Lloyd Erlick's site (www.heylloyd.com). He says the key is the right tension on the clip to avoid teethmarks/dimples. He also has quite a bit written about the one tray method.
    Cheers,
    The Rat

  5. #15

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    Lloyd Erlick and I are two proponents of the one-tray method. Lloyd uses his
    chemistry multi-use while I use it one-shot. Anybody who feels crowded in
    their darkroom with the multi-tray method will realy welcome the one-tray
    way. See my previous post this thread. Dan

  6. #16
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    If you do stack your chem trays, get/make a stacker system that will hold 11x14 trays (or larger if you have the room) as opposed to 8x10. I found after switching to FB printing I also started doing a LOT more 11x14's. If you stack for 8x10 trays, you may kick yourself later if you want to go larger.

  7. #17
    geraldatwork's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    Do you ever get "rippled" edges using that method? I used one of those for years and that was an occasional problem that I never was able to solve (other than by dry mounting).

    That lends credence to the theory that dry-down is caused by shrinkage.
    Yes I do get rippled edges although they are mild. I dry mount my prints. One of the advantages I find to dry mounting is for easy showing of my prints. I just trim the prints and mount on an archival board without cutting an over mat. If I get a good reaction or feel the print is warranted then I'll cut an over mat. Prints show much better when mounted in some manner.

    As far as dry-down the dryer dried prints seem to have very slightly better blacks and very slightly more dry-down effect. But the differences could be based on slight variations in dodging and burning and also toning.

  8. #18
    David Ruby's Avatar
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    I didn't think about spanning the sink. That is a good idea. I am planning on making whatever stacking, tray ladder solution I work out for 11x14's as well. I already have the trays, just not an easy way to use them! I'm going to print off Ilford's pdf on fiber processing. I'm still confused on the process, mainly the wash, hypo, wash area. I'm probably just not reading right, but between the various posts and what the Kodak dataguide says I'm all messed up! I'll get through it!
    Thanks everyone.

  9. #19

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    Not so fast, David. We're not through with you yet!
    If you didn't want a complicated life, you wouldn't have a darkroom in the first place. Nonetheless, don't complicate your life with two, three, or seven bath developers--use VC fiber paper and use split filter exposure. With this method you will be very happy with one developer/time/temp. and can use your other complication credits on washing.
    I use Kodak HypoClear. I don't wash prints in water after the second fix. I do wash the cleared prints in my vertical washer for an hour. My washer sits on 1" ply, cantilevered over the sink, to make room for the second fix, which I think is essential. The second fix minimizes transfer of silver salts, residual acid from the stop bath, and the rest of the chemical bouillabaisse that comes out of the first fix.
    For toning, I place a second board over the developer and stop trays and place the tray of toner and one with water on top of that board, then wash, then hypoclear, then back into the washer for 1/2 hr.
    Try these tips. You won't be disappointed, and you might be less confused, or at least less confused than I am!

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