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  1. #11
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjprat View Post
    Thomas,

    that looks good for me, specialy the second image. That's what I'm looking for!!! But, how did you get it? Ok, lith printing (I know what is it) but which developer? Which film? Which paper (lith) developer? ...

    Thanks to everybody for your help,

    jxprat
    Hi,

    The picture on the left is Fotokemika Varycon.
    The right hand side picture is Foma Fomabrom Variant 112, processed in Fotospeed LD20 or Arista Lith (powder or liquid). I use negatives of very high contrast.
    Usually I use 100ml Part A to 1,400ml water, 100ml Part B to 1,400ml water, mix those together. Add 800ml old brown for a total gallon of liquid. Then I season it with two sheets of 8x10 paper with the lights on until they are completely black.
    Developer at 75 degrees Fahrenheit or about 24 degrees Celsius.

    The film used doesn't matter, because it doesn't really impart much of its character to the print. It could be Acros and it could be Delta 3200, and it wouldn't really matter. Just expose and develop it to high contrast.

    The print has been toned in both Kodak Sepia II warm and rapid selenium toner.

    Good luck,

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #12

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    Tri-X developed in Dektol.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13
    jjprat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Hi,

    The picture on the left is Fotokemika Varycon.
    The right hand side picture is Foma Fomabrom Variant 112, processed in Fotospeed LD20 or Arista Lith (powder or liquid). I use negatives of very high contrast.
    Usually I use 100ml Part A to 1,400ml water, 100ml Part B to 1,400ml water, mix those together. Add 800ml old brown for a total gallon of liquid. Then I season it with two sheets of 8x10 paper with the lights on until they are completely black.
    Developer at 75 degrees Fahrenheit or about 24 degrees Celsius.

    The film used doesn't matter, because it doesn't really impart much of its character to the print. It could be Acros and it could be Delta 3200, and it wouldn't really matter. Just expose and develop it to high contrast.

    The print has been toned in both Kodak Sepia II warm and rapid selenium toner.

    Good luck,

    - Thomas
    Perfect!!!

    Thank you very much!!!

  4. #14
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Grain texture screens are another way to go. Either make them by 10x enlarging a grainy smooth (no image) negative onto lith film or buy them. For even larger grain you can make a second generation enlargement - that results in 100x grain.

    Although normally contacted with the paper, it is possible to lay the screen in contact with the negative for larger grain.
    Last edited by Nicholas Lindan; 03-15-2011 at 01:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruilourosa View Post
    another way is to use the only developer formulated especifically to do this: FX-16 by Geoffrey Crawley

    it takes glicyn, so i did not use it often, it goes bad relativelly fast, but the results are better, less mushyness and more aparent sculptoric quality,

    cumprimentos de portugal
    The problem with FX-16 is that it requires a dye pinacryptol yellow which is very hard to obtain.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    Just a warning.....Fomabrom is by far the grainest paper for lith printing. It is also the most difficult to control. My best success with it is to presoak it in water before putting in lith developer and constantly and gently agitate. Thomas's advice is spot on.

  7. #17

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    I remember reading some years ago that Kodak SD-19a was outstanding at producing very large grain. I saw one photo taken with it and the grain was huge! The formula for SD-19a was just D-19 with some hydrazine dihydrochloride added along with some 6-nitrobenzimidazole nitrate (aka Anti-Fog No. 2). I think the latter chemical may have been renamed 5-nitrobenzimidazole not too long ago...

    The hydrazine dihydrochloride may not be too easy to obtain unless you work for NASA ;-)

  8. #18

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    Tri x in HC110 at the shortest development time, I think the temp is around 78 degrees F

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paterson View Post
    Tri x in HC110 at the shortest development time, I think the temp is around 78 degrees F
    That's what I do but about 72 degrees.

    Jeff

  10. #20
    tjaded's Avatar
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    I think the most grain I have ever seen was a student that developed Delta 3200 in paper developer (as assigned) but agitated for the ENTIRE time, like he was making a martini!
    --------------------
    "Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it." -Paul Strand

    www.glasskeyphoto.com

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