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  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    What kind of toning process is this?

    Hi APUGers.

    I've been doing this toning process off and on for over 10 years. While I was assisting, I learned this process where you take a BW print that printed darker than normal, then it's "toned" in a solution of potassium Ferricyanide and potassium bromide. The print is bleached to a certain point. I then wash the bleached print then re-expose it in bright sunlight. The image comes back a brownish. It looks sort of like a lith print. Is this a toning process? How toxic is the solution of potassium Ferricyanide and potassium bromide? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I would think after you get the desired effect, do your fix , hypo clear and wash sequence again.

  3. #3
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Not needed

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Carnie View Post
    I would think after you get the desired effect, do your fix , hypo clear and wash sequence again.
    I've had prints that are 10 years old and there wasn't any fixing after toning the prints. Just a wash to remove any residual toner.

  4. #4

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    Both potassium bromide and potassium ferricyanide are not very toxic just don't eat them. Usually when you bleach a print you refix it to remove the bleached silver.
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  5. #5
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Does exposure to sun get convert the bleached siver?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Both potassium bromide and potassium ferricyanide are not very toxic just don't eat them. Usually when you bleach a print you refix it to remove the bleached silver.
    I'm just curious, does exposure to bleached silver on a print convert it to a form that is stable when exposed to sunlight? It seems that when I expose the print bleached in the solution of potassium bromide and potassium ferricyanide, the image comes back brownish which is pretty stable.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    I'm just curious, does exposure to bleached silver on a print convert it to a form that is stable when exposed to sunlight? It seems that when I expose the print bleached in the solution of potassium bromide and potassium ferricyanide, the image comes back brownish which is pretty stable.
    Well it's the same principle as a POP, light converts the Silver Bromide (in this case) to Silver, it'll be a far weaker image than if you'd used Thiourea or Sulphide toner.

    Unlike POP you are giving a full fogging exposure. There no need to fix, in fact the silver grains are so fine a fixer would bleach the image. A plain Sodium thiosulphate bath would work very dilute, but a modern rapid fixer would remove the image quickly.

    Ian

  7. #7
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    Sounds like a neat process. I imagine the print is exposed to sunlight after it has dried after bleaching and rinsing.

    The print should be stable, though it may continue to darken if the sunlight didn't convert all the silver-halide.

    I wouldn't fix the print or do any other wet process to it after it has been exposed to sunlight to print-out.
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  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Ideally for permanence it should be toned, Gold & Platinum were used historically, without it has very little protection from environmental influences and is more susceptible than most other processes.

    Ian

  9. #9
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Hey thanks Ian and Nicholas. I learned the "secret" process many years ago. I don't know if other photographers are doing it. I'll scan a print I made and post it on this thread.

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    It's not exactly a secret process

    In the Art of Photography exhibition 1989 shown US the Uk and Australia to celebrate 150 years of photography there were many older POP images, they ahd to be viewed in very subdued light due to their impermanence.

    Early photographers soon found the images degraded and began using toners to give protect and give images a longer life.

    Ian

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