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  1. #1
    bvy
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    Pushing My First Roll

    Iíll be developing my first black and white film this weekend. Itís Kodak Tri-X 400 that I shot using my Olympus XA2. One problem (maybe): I had the camera set to 800, so Iíve underexposed by one stop.

    It wasnít my intention to complicate things for this, my first film developing experience, but hopefully itís not too big a deal; I think pushing means just adjusting the development time. Problem is, Iíve see references that say do nothing different if itís only one stop, and others that say to multiply the development time by 1.5.

    Can someone help? My developer is Kodak D76 that I mixed up earlier this week. How should I adjust the development time? Also, should I use it stock or diluted? My other chemicals are Kodak Indicator Stop and Ilford Rapid Fixer.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    hpulley's Avatar
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    Kodak's data sheet F-4017 says 1 stop underexposure is normal development which is 6:45 @20C/68F with D-76 stock or 9:45 @20C/68F with D-76 1+1. Using 1+1 gives better economy, longer development times which can give more even results; it can give slightly different grain and constrast as well but at this point it doesn't really matter that much so just decide if you want your D-76 to go twice as far or not (if you won't use it much you might as well use it stock so it doesn't go bad if you made a big batch).
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  3. #3
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    One stop under with this film doesn't require adjustment.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." AnaÔs Nin

  4. #4
    hrst's Avatar
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    I'd still do push processing even if some suggest that it's "good enough" without doing it. However, if you are unsure, that 50% extra can be too much.

    This is not rocket science, but rather a process where you find the best developing time that suits your taste and processing style. If others say 50% extra and others no change, why not put 25% extra?

  5. #5

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    I agree with the no adjustment required. What was the subject and lighting situation? If it was flat and not with much contrast you might consider a longer development time but I would go less than +25%. Also if you have not established the effective ISO for your equipment with that film you may not have underexposed it. So, go with no adjustment and if the results are not to your liking consider it a learning experience and make corrections the next time.

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  6. #6
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hrst View Post
    I'd still do push processing even if some suggest that it's "good enough" without doing it.
    One of the "some" is Kodak.

    Pushing doesn't appreciably change the shadow point. So no significant gain in detail is available there.

    Pushing increases grain, that can be a drawback.

    There's lots of latitude in the film and 1-stop under is easy to adjust for in printing.

    Without testing done by the OP I see no upside to pushing in this situation.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." AnaÔs Nin

  7. #7
    brucemuir's Avatar
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    What were the lighting conditions of the roll or was it many different scenes with all different lighting?

  8. #8
    bvy
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    Thanks. These are all outdoor shots. About 75% of the roll is cloudy or cloudy/bright, 25% is full sun. It's mostly street photography, buildings, walls, etc. It's a 24 exposure roll if that matters.

  9. #9
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    I tell my students, when shooting film that contains lots of different subjects and scenes, don't push. But since you already underexposed a stop, the general rule that works well is to multiply the recommended time by 1.4, for each stop you've underexposed. Some shots will be OK, some won't. There's a frustration factor in photography. Pushing film, pushes that factor.

  10. #10
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    I would add atleast 20% to the development time. I believe the normal time for Tri-x and D-76 1:1 is around 10 minutes. Try 12 or 13 minutes. Since you don't have much established yet as far as a normal development time, as others said, use this as a learning experience. The shots in overcast lighting should benefit from being shot at 800 anyway.

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