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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    I get beautiful negatives every time.
    Yes, but what do the prints look like? In the Mikado, Katasha has the most beautiful elbow of any woman in Japan. Of course, her face frightens the horses.

    I have seen some beautiful negatives that are impossible to print. Before anyone contenplates using stand development as their system for all lighting situations they need to do some extensive reading on The Zone System.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12
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    I experimented on my own (years ago) and experience "bromide burn" streaks. I'll have to post the photo sometime.

    Seems I am always ahead of the times.

  3. #13
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    I get great tones out of normal contrast scenes with stand and semi-stand, it is superb.

  4. #14

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    Some basic generalizations regarding stand development besides the obvious risk of uneven development (I'm defining "stand" as either no agitation after the first minute or an additional short agitation sequence about halfway through the development time - typically 30-90 minutes):

    1. Typically works best with slower films
    2. Typically works best with highly diluted non-solvent developers
    3. Typically results in higher effective film speed - but also somewhat less pronounced highlight compression than one might expect
    4. Typically results in enhanced or sometimes exagerrated (halo) edge effects

    Results can be quite different than compensating development (ie reduced agitation with diluted developers). The overall tonal scale and particularly micro-contrast produced by stand development are unique. Make prints of test negatives to see the results and decide if it is what you are looking for. Some people claim stand development gives negatives that "print themselves". I don't think this is the case. It is not a fail-safe, just another, different technique.

    Regarding highlight compression, if this is your goal, I have found even more control is possible with less severe/risky reduced agitation/dilution methods, however usually with lower effective film speed than pure stand development.

    Regarding edge effects ehnancing apparent sharpness, reduced agitation methods also do this, although the effect is more exagerrated with stand development. Note however unless the edge effects are very exagerrated, substantial enlargement is typically required in order to see the difference.

  5. #15

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    I use semi-stand for all B&W films at all speeds (35mm and 120 for now). For each roll of film, I use Rodinal 1+200 (1 part Rodinal, 200 parts water) in a 600 ml Patterson tank (so, 3 ml Rodinal, 600 ml water). Agitate using 5 slow taurus inversions, then leave for 1 hour. Agitate for another 5 inversions, then leave for another hour. Dump, water stop, fix, rinse as normal.

    For me this has several advantages:

    - all time/temp/agitation is the same, regardless of film - so, your technique can be absolutely consistent
    - it develops to completion, so if the film was capable of recording a scene at whatever ISO/EI it was shot at, it will be developed. So, pushed or pulled on the same roll of film (such as Tri-X or HP5+), it doesn't matter.
    - the agitation in the middle eliminates any uneven development/bromide drag issues that might occur with a "pure" no-agitation stand technique (which I also tried), but is still hands-off enough to be drop-dead easy and not stressful at all
    - the extended time in the water-heavy developer ensures most films' anti-halation dye wash out completely right off the hop (actually, so far it's worked for *all* films except some older Pan-F I left undeveloped for over a year)

    The disadvantage, of course, is it takes 2 hrs. to process a roll of film But I'm OK with that, I don't shoot in any kind of Winogrand-ish quanitity

    Try it, see if you like it. Chacun son gout, as the French say.
    Last edited by mabman; 03-28-2011 at 07:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    i can't wait to take a picture of my thumb with this beautiful camera.

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  6. #16
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Yes, but what do the prints look like? In the Mikado, Katasha has the most beautiful elbow of any woman in Japan. Of course, her face frightens the horses.

    I have seen some beautiful negatives that are impossible to print. Before anyone contenplates using stand development as their system for all lighting situations they need to do some extensive reading on The Zone System.
    This method gives me negatives that allow me to make prints that satisfy me, often without the need for extensive dodging and burning.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  7. #17

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    Instead of a new thread, I thought it would be better to resurrect this one. I just got some HC110 and want to use if for some Freestyle arista.edu ultra. I was thinking a "semi stand" with dilution "H" and agitate about half way through.

    In the past when I have used the Arista liquid developer, the brighter lit areas are blown out to the point its nearly impossible to see those areas.

    Would semi-stand in HC110 improve things, or should I consider something different?

  8. #18

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    First thoroughly read michael's post. I would try HC-110 1+49 with normal agitation. This is a very good site for using HC-110, www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by madgardener View Post
    Instead of a new thread, I thought it would be better to resurrect this one. I just got some HC110 and want to use if for some Freestyle arista.edu ultra. I was thinking a "semi stand" with dilution "H" and agitate about half way through.

    In the past when I have used the Arista liquid developer, the brighter lit areas are blown out to the point its nearly impossible to see those areas.

    Would semi-stand in HC110 improve things, or should I consider something different?
    I've never used Arista developer, but HC110 is a flexible general purpose solvent developer. It will not "blow out" highlights unless the exposure range is very long and/or the film is overdeveloped. Even with very high contrast subjects, dilution and agitation alterations can be made to control contrast without resorting to stand development, which should be considered an extreme procedure. Stand development should not be viewed simply as a procedure for contrast reduction. There are simpler, more controlled ways of doing that. Stand development is a technique that produces it's own unique tonalities and/or edge effects. You should first establish a controlled "normal" exposure/development routine with your film and developer before moving to stand or semi-stand techniques.

    It is also worth noting just because highlights look dense in the negative, or print white, doesn't mean they are blown out. There may very well be detail in the negative which needs to be brought into the print with burning/dodging or other print manipulations. Perhaps a more mild reduction in negative development will make your negatives easier to print without extreme measures. Sometimes extreme contrast reductions can destroy highlight separations, which leads them to be truly "blown out".

  10. #20

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    Thanks for the information and advice. The suggestions in the link you provided, Mr. Koch' is worth a lot. Thank you Michael for your information too. I found both to be very informative. Thanks again!

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