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  1. #11
    Max
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    I expose it at 100. No matter - I asked for a ballpark time to start, and gave me one. It didn't work for me, but I'm still appreciative for your help!

  2. #12
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    max- i've been playing around with begger 200 and pyrocat-hd. this is also my first time running sheet film in a tray as well. i just took a look at my notes. i rated my film at 200 asa. i pre-soaked for 5min. at 68f i ran one sheet of 8x10 film 1:1:100 for 25min and another sheet at 69f 2:2:100 for 17.5min. i agitated about 5sec out of evey 30sec. the sheet i ran at 2:2:100 has more contrast than the other but both look pretty good, but i'm still learning how to judge my negs. they are printable is about all i can say for now. since you shot your film at 100asa, i'd knock about 20% off my developement time and start there. the 20% is just a guess but it should get you in the ballpark i think ;-)

    hope this helps -
    tomtom

  3. #13
    Max
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    this is also my first time running sheet film in a tray as well.
    I don't know what I was so afraid of - it was actually much easier than using the drum. I did get a small scratch (not my last, I'm sure), but I know what caused it now: 11x14 trays seem awfully big right now, and I didn't have the sheets lined up.

  4. #14
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    the very first sheet i developed in a tray i almost bolted out of the darkroom. ya see, i don't like being in total darkness for very long. but i'm getting use to it :-) after about the 3rd sheet i couldn't imagine what i was so afraid of besides the dark ;-) it was pretty easy once i adjusted to where everything was. yeah i know it's funny a darkroom person afraid of the dark. well that me

    Quote Originally Posted by Max
    11x14 trays seem awfully big right now, and I didn't have the sheets lined up.
    what size film are you running? and how many sheet were you runnung?
    i think i'm going to look into a slosher tray. photographers formulary sells them and they seem easier than the sheet over sheet method. your also less likely to scratch your film. the down side is you can only run 4 sheet at a time. if you get good with the other method you can do atleast twice as much.

    tomtom

  5. #15
    Max
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    I was doing 8x10 - only two sheets at once, for now. When I get the hang of it, I plan to do more at a time.

    The slosher tray idea is pretty interesting, but it's bigger than I have room for in my current "darkroom" (table in the basement). I think I'll get the hang of the sheet-over-sheet method.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max
    But since I'm here, does anyone use sodium metaborate with pyrocat? I'm used to working with rollo pyro, and I always did a presoak with sodium metaborate, and another post-fix, pre-wash sodium metaborate soak.

    The rollo pyro instructions say this post-fix soak is when most of the stain forms (I know nothing of the chemistry involved here).

    I didn't get much stain with pyrocat. Is it the lack of sodium metaborate, or just a symptom of the really thin negs?
    A few comments, all relevant to the thread but not necessarily to this message.

    First, don't use a sodium metaborate pre-soak with Pyrocat-HD. The pH of a metaborte solution is not compatible ( lower in this case) with the working Pyrocat-HD solution. If you want to use an alkaline pre-soak try instead a weak carbonate solution.

    Second, although there may be some exceptions by batch, the true film speed of BPF 200 is about EI 100, the same as that of Ilford FP4+, or perhaps even slower, and this is with all developers. This fact has been amply documented in the literature and I have confirmed it in my own comparison testing. So rate BPF at an EI of 100 or even less if you want good shadow detail.

    Third, thin negatives are almost always a result of under-exposure in the camera, either caused by rating the film at too high an EI or by improper metering techniques. Properly exposed negatives may look a bit flat if underdeveloped but they don't usually look thin.

    BPF negatives that have received the same exposure look almost almost identical in density (but not in the color of the stain) when developed in Pyrocat-HD 2:2:100 as when developed in a standard 2:4:100 dilution of Rollo Pyro. .

    As for developing times, here is what I recommend for BPF with the 1:1:100 dilution. This is based on rotary development in tubes at 72 degrees F with gentle but constant agitation. If you develop in tray or tank increase time by about 15-20%.

    Graded silver papers -- About 6:30 for scenes of normal contrast.

    Variable contrast papers -- About 9:30 for scenes of normal contrast.

    AZO -- About 12-14 minutes for scenes of normal contrast, or about 7:30 with the 2:2:100 dilution. If you develop for AZO you should also be able to print on a VC papers of Grade #1 with the same negative.


    Sandy
    Last edited by sanking; 09-21-2004 at 10:47 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17
    Max
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    I'm pretty confident of the exposure - the two things I changed here were tray processing (vs. unicolor drum) and developer.

    There could be two things going on here:

    1) Perhaps my tray agitation technique is faulty. I tried doing what was described in The Negative: pulling the bottom sheet out and placing it on top. Since I was just doing two sheets, I did it a few times for (roughly) ten seconds every minute. It was the first time, so I'm sure I wasn't as consistent as I should be yet.

    2) I'm used to seeing negs developed for Azo, and by the times you've provided here, I gave it less than the time for "normal" graded silver papers.

    Obviously, I'm just doing some testing here, so there's no loss whatsoever (unless someone was really excited about a picture of a black t-shirt and the white side of an old darkcloth hanging on a fence). There's no question that I'm learning a lot from it, either!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Second, although there may be some exceptions by batch, the true film speed of BPF 200 is about EI 100, the same as that of Ilford FP4+, or perhaps even slower, and this is with all developers. This fact has been amply documented in the literature and I have confirmed it in my own comparison testing. So rate BPF at an EI of 100 or even less if you want good shadow detail.Sandy
    sandy - is your graph on unblinkingeye for bpf200 rated at 100asa? i sort of used those charts to figure out a development time but i rated my film at 200asa. now i'm not sure if my negs are fine or under developed or exposed :-?

    oh well, i'll be rating it at 100asa for now on :-)

    tomtom

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max

    1) Perhaps my tray agitation technique is faulty. I tried doing what was described in The Negative: pulling the bottom sheet out and placing it on top. Since I was just doing two sheets, I did it a few times for (roughly) ten seconds every minute. It was the first time, so I'm sure I wasn't as consistent as I should be yet.
    I tried letting mine sit for a little bit but got eneven development, s I move them all the time. I avoided scratches when I put the emulsion side down, that might help some.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  10. #20
    Max
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    Thanks - I'll give that a shot!

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