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  1. #1
    Max
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    BPF200 in Pyrocat time (tray)?

    I'm getting ready to do my first attempt at tray developing (been using a Unicolor drum), which will also be my first time with Pyrocat. I've got some J&C Classic on the way, but I've got some BPF200 that I'll be using up, learning how to do tray processing without scratches, etc...

    Anyway, which dilution should I use (1:1:100 or 2:2:100) and for how long (agitating 5 sec every 30 seconds)? Just looking for a ballpark for the first time - these are normal contrast negs.

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max
    I'm getting ready to do my first attempt at tray developing (been using a Unicolor drum), which will also be my first time with Pyrocat. I've got some J&C Classic on the way, but I've got some BPF200 that I'll be using up, learning how to do tray processing without scratches, etc...

    Anyway, which dilution should I use (1:1:100 or 2:2:100) and for how long (agitating 5 sec every 30 seconds)? Just looking for a ballpark for the first time - these are normal contrast negs.

    Thanks!
    What are you planning to do in the way of printing these negatives? If you want these developed to a density range suitable for enlarging the I would develop in the 1-1-100 dilution. If you want a density range that is suitable for contact printing on Azo, for instance, then the 2-2-100 dilution would be in order.

    I would typically develop normal contrast BPF 200 for six minutes at 70 degrees.

  3. #3

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    Donald

    My negs at 6 minutes in 2:2:100 are way thin for a normal SBR of 7. Sandy called for over double of that for a normal range, and I have settled on a time of 17.30 with normal agitation. Since this is going to be a situation not constantly agitating the film wouldn't the times be longer?

    I realize that people's times differ but do they normally differ this much? I shoot BPF at 200, like I do the classic 200 since it is the same stuff. would this have something to do with it?
    Last edited by mark; 09-20-2004 at 09:54 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: I forgot something
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  4. #4
    Max
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    I shot it at 100, and it was still really thin with just 6 minutes.

    Oh well - I was just looking for a starting point, and I got one. Thanks!

  5. #5
    Max
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    But since I'm here, does anyone use sodium metaborate with pyrocat? I'm used to working with rollo pyro, and I always did a presoak with sodium metaborate, and another post-fix, pre-wash sodium metaborate soak.

    The rollo pyro instructions say this post-fix soak is when most of the stain forms (I know nothing of the chemistry involved here).

    I didn't get much stain with pyrocat. Is it the lack of sodium metaborate, or just a symptom of the really thin negs?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max
    But since I'm here, does anyone use sodium metaborate with pyrocat? I'm used to working with rollo pyro, and I always did a presoak with sodium metaborate, and another post-fix, pre-wash sodium metaborate soak.

    The rollo pyro instructions say this post-fix soak is when most of the stain forms (I know nothing of the chemistry involved here).

    I didn't get much stain with pyrocat. Is it the lack of sodium metaborate, or just a symptom of the really thin negs?
    When you say "I didn't get much stain with pyrocat" do you base this on blue channel or UV densitometry?

    It is difficult to assess pyrocat stain visually - the practical question is: How does it print?

    "The rollo pyro instructions say this post-fix soak is when most of the stain forms (I know nothing of the chemistry involved here)."

    I haven't used rollo pyro, but pyrocat does the important (i.e. proportional) staining and tanning during development - not afterward.

    Stain deposited post development is overall stain and not really useful.
    Tom Hoskinson
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  7. #7

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    With Pyrocat-HD you should do a plain water presoak before developing. Follow development with a water rinse (no acid stopbath) and fix in a non-hardening fixer - I prefer an alkaline fixer.

    If after fixing the film still has persistent antihalation dye, I bathe the film for 5 minutes in a sodium sulfite solution (20 grams/liter), followed by washing.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Max, if you have not yet done so, read Sandy King's excellent article on pyro developers on unblinking eye.com:

    http://unblinkingeye.com/Articles/PCat/pcat.html
    Tom Hoskinson
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  9. #9
    Max
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    It is difficult to assess pyrocat stain visually - the practical question is: How does it print?
    Ah - okay. I was just going on the visual; the rollo negs look very stained, and the pyrocat negs looked pretty much like all my D76 negs.

    I haven't printed them yet since they were drying - but they're so thin I doubt they'll really print well. I'll reshoot and redevelop and go from there.

    I did do the presoak - I've always been a presoaker, no matter what developer I'm using (a habit I got into when I was still doing 35mm TMax).
    And I'll check out that article.

    Thanks for all the help here!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    Donald

    My negs at 6 minutes in 2:2:100 are way thin for a normal SBR of 7. Sandy called for over double of that for a normal range, and I have settled on a time of 17.30 with normal agitation. Since this is going to be a situation not constantly agitating the film wouldn't the times be longer?

    I realize that people's times differ but do they normally differ this much? I shoot BPF at 200, like I do the classic 200 since it is the same stuff. would this have something to do with it?
    Max, I imagine that the departure of your results from mine are due to the fact that I expose BPF 200 at EI 80 for SBR 7. The only time that I personally would use an EI of 200 would be in extreme expansion situations. Since this film will not give more then one zone of expansion in my testing that is to say that the times that I personally would use EI 200 with BPF 200 would be never.

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