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  1. #21

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    I prefer Ilford Delta 100 to 100 T-Max for 35mm as it appears to me to have less tendency to curl across the width after drying.Here is a technical comparison of the two, likely the relation would be similar if developed in D-76 or Xtol:
    www.imx.nl/photo/Film/page123/page123.html

  2. #22
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
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    T-Max 100.

    Develop it in Microdol-X for Tech-Pan like grain. M-X is no longer made, but Ilford has an equivelant, name escapes me.

    Tech-Pan / Technidol will do better, but you can only get it on ebay.

    But if you really want no grain then you need to go to MF or LF. Even an inexpensive Zeiss Nettar folder loaded with T-Max will have finer grain and better resolution when resolving low-contrast detail.

    Nothing beats square inches.
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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by samuelingram View Post
    I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.
    For the first two requirements, just about any modern B&W film qualifies. Good shadow detail is on you -- you have to get the right exposure for that. But certainly any film from Kodak, Fuji, or Harmon will work for you.
    Bruce Watson
    AchromaticArts.com

  4. #24

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    I love Pan F+ in 120 or 35mm, but now I am shooting Delta 100 because I can shoot both 120 and 4x5 with the same emulsion and it makes my processing easier.

  5. #25

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    T-Max 100 is my suggestion. It is sharp, fine grained, and holds a bit more detail and bite in the low tones than many films. It is highly controllable with processing variations, and has excellent exposure latitude. It looks great in any developer.

    You can get finer grain and more resolution from a few other specialty films, but you will have to really work to get low-enough contrast out of them, and they will be much slower. They definitely do not meet your "basic processing" criterion.

    If not T-Max, then try Ilford Delta 100 or Fuji Neopan Acros (which is ISO 100 speed).

    HP5 is a 400 film. FP4 is a 125 film. HP = high-speed panchromatic, and FP = fine-grained panchromatic, I believe. Neither are flat-grained/t-grained/tabular-grained films like T-Max, Delta, or Acros. They are Ilford's competitors to Kodak Tri-X 400 and Plus-X 125.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

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  6. #26
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post
    Develop it in Microdol-X for Tech-Pan like grain. M-X is no longer made, but Ilford has an equivelant, name escapes me.
    I captured it out in my back yard.

    Perceptol.

    Lee

  7. #27
    JCJackson's Avatar
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    Freestyle offers a developer called Legacy Pro Mic-X that is claimed to be identical in formulation to the discontinued Kodak Microdol-X. This will give very fine, smooth grain with most of the films discussed above. But in my experience, Microdol-X yields negatives that are a little soft, lacking a bit in acutance, so I'm not sure it is the best choice to get something "sharp."

  8. #28

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    Perceptol is the readily available Ilford equivalent. It is a wonderful developer and my primary developer at this point. However as with any highly solvent developer, the finer grain is produced at the expense of sharpness. This can be temperred somewhat by diluting, but even at 1+3 Microdol/Perceptol type developers are not biting like acutance developers. There is always a tradeoff between fine grain and acutance. Most general purpose developers are formulated to provide a good balance. Keep in mind super-fine grain solvent developers like Microdol-X, Perceptol, A49 etc also exact a speed penalty, usually of about 1 stop, sometimes a little less. Another thing to keep in mind is the super-fine grain effect is really only produced at normal or reduced contrast development. Extending development time with these developers, either to attempt pushing speed, or to increase contrast, quickly causes an increase in graininess to the point you'd be better off using a more active developer like D76 or XTOL which will give you pretty much the same level of graininess as Perceptol in that situation, but with better film speed and greater acutance.

  9. #29
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    In 35mm the smallest grain I find is PanF+, no grain visible at 11x14" enlargements, developed in DD-X 1+4. Super sharp as well, beautiful stuff.

    Delta 100 135 I still find grainy if I really look at an 11x14" enlargement, developed in either DD-X 1+4 or HC-110 1+31.

    For some reason I haven't tried T-Max 100 in 35mm lately but in 120 it is incredible stuff, absolutely grainless in 6x7 enlarged to 11x14". Looks nice developed in HC-110 1+31. Seeing how good T-Max 100 is in 120 I should really try some in 35mm but I have a lot of Delta 100 in storage that I'm working through now.
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  10. #30
    Mark Fisher's Avatar
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    My experience mirrors Thomas'. For 100 speed, I love Acros. Surprisingly, Tmax 400 isn't far behind. If you are shooting handheld, the 400 speed image may be sharper than the 100 speed. In the end, though, sharpness isn't the only parameter in choosing a film. Tri-x is beautiful to my eye and it is neither fine grained or sharp compared to most other films.

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