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  1. #1

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    Looking for a sharp film.

    I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.

    I'm looking at Ilford HP5 Plus 125, but have no experience with Ilford films so I'm reluctant to buy some.

    Any recommendations?

  2. #2

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    You might try Ilford Pan F (50asa/ifo).

    Jeff

  3. #3
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by samuelingram View Post
    I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.

    I'm looking at Ilford HP5 Plus 125, but have no experience with Ilford films so I'm reluctant to buy some.

    Any recommendations?
    What format? Pan F is not made in sheet film.
    Jim

  4. #4

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    T-Max 100

    Kodak T-Max 100 is one of the sharpest films around. Iíve experimented with new films as they come into the market. This has the best combination of speed, sharpness, smooth tonal scale and great enlargability. It has become the only B&W film I use in 35mm, 120, 4" x 5", and 8" x 10".

    It can be processed in any B&W developer, but is particularly suitable for development in Kodak T-Max developer. Thatís a good combination because T-Max Developer is a liquid concentrate making it particularly easy to use. You can easily mix just enough to develop a small number of films. Thereís not need to mix the entire bottle of concentrate.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by samuelingram View Post
    I'm looking for a sharp, fine grain film, with good detail in the blacks. One that will get good results with basic processing methods.

    I'm looking at Ilford HP5 Plus 125, but have no experience with Ilford films so I'm reluctant to buy some.

    Any recommendations?
    HP5 Plus is an ISO 400 film. FP4 Plus is Ilford's ISO 125 film and it is very good as are most films in the ISO 100-125 speed group.

  6. #6
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    For 35mm or 120 I would have to vote for Pan F+.
    Jim

  7. #7

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    Another vote for Tmax-100. It's a film with fine grain, sharp, and good contrast.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #8
    David William White's Avatar
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    Irresponsible Suggestion: If you really need to go to the wall, look for some B/W duplicating film. Really slow, most varieties not panchromatic, but astounding. Last year I was shooting often with some Eastman Intermediate film (it was pan), and I enlarged 35mm to 16x20 with no visible grain. I developed it in both D-76 and Technidol, but any differences were lost on me, so I'm sure just about any developer would work.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  9. #9

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    Fuji 100 Acros, T-Max 100, Pan-F+, Ilford Delta 100. All sharp and fine-grained. HP5+, Tri-X, faster, not so fine-grained. T-Max 400, Ilford Delta 400, both fast, sharp, finer grain than the older-technology HP5+ and Tri-X. All are influenced by developer choice, development method and exposure. Take your pick!

    Peter Gomena

  10. #10

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    Try a broken dry plate.

    Sorry, couldn't resist.

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