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Thread: Bulk Loading

  1. #11
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I'm concerned about that too. I don't remember having huge problems with it but back in those days, scratches seemed commonplace even with factory film. My technique must have really sucked. I went through so much nose grease that I could have used a second nose.

    How about winding the film onto the spool in the loader and then going dark to slip on the cassette? That way the film doesn't have to go through the felt (until it's in the camera) and it doesn't add too much inconvenience if you have a place where you load holders anyway.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I've never had a problem with scratched film due to bulk loading. I usually use the cartridges about three or four times at most, and I have an Alden 74 bulk loader that I think I've had for about 20 years.
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  3. #13

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    Good Evening,

    I have a Watson bulk loader which I use only occasionally since I don't shoot a lot of 35mm. I'll second the idea of aiming for 35 exposure rolls because of the ease of contacting. Eighteen or nineteen full cartridges per 100 feet is about right. I can't recall ever having a problem with scratches, even though I have sometimes used the cartridges more times than is usually thought advisable.

    Konical

  4. #14
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    Here's a better question. Buying cassettes eats up the savings of bulk loading. I remember when Ilford film cassettes had pop-off caps and could be re-used with a bulk loader.
    What films come in reusable cassettes these days?


    My first "real" camera was an Exacta VX1000. which among it's novel features, allowed you to put a film cassette in the takeup position. If you wanted to process a partial roll, you could just advance the film into the takup cassette, pull down a built-in, internal cutter blade and open the back. That was a wonderful, versatile camera for a young photographer at the beginning of a long road, anxious to experiment and learn.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I think the 70mm Combat Graphic rangefinder also has that internal knife feature.

    I remember those old Ilford snap-cap cartridges. I don't know of any manufacturers that still use them. Maybe some of the East Europeans or someplace like Freestyle, which sells house-brand film loaded from bulk rolls.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  6. #16
    rjr
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    The soviet Start SLR had an internal knife, too.

    David,

    Efke uses reloadable cassettes. I don´t know of Foma or Forte, I always used either type 120 or bulk film from Foma. Lucky supposedly comes in snap-caps, too.

    I usually recycle normal crimped cassettes (Kodak, Fuji, Agfa, Ilford) - when processing them myself I leave out the last frame and cut off accordingly. The bulk film is taped on that small tongue still protuding out of the cassette.

    Works fine with me - never had any scratches from bulk loading in3 years now. :-)

    The best cassettes I use are made my AP in Spain and they have the bayonett snap cap ORWO used to make - I believe the AP derive from those classic ORWO plastic cassettes.
    Tschüss,
    Roman

  7. #17
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I'm not familiar with the Start but the Exacta was made it Soviet occupied Germany.

    I think that Efke and JandC cassettes have pop off caps. I always try to pop new films before prying. It's an old habit.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #18
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    I have two Watsons which are loaded with TMax 100 and Tri-X. I typicallyu get 18 or 19 rolls. I count clicks until it hits 40. I label ALL my cassettes and keep track of which ones are used for which roll as they're shot -- if there is a light leak (occasional) or scratch (very rare) on the developed negs, the cassette is discarded. I have used these loaders for years without a problem or a loader-attributable scratch.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
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  9. #19

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    I'm about to take the bulk-loading plunge; can anyone recommend a particular brand/type/source of 35mm cassette/cartridge? I'd prefer to order from an APUG sponsor if possible.

  10. #20
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    When I was doing it my favorite type was the plastic ones with the screw on end. They can be washed and not rust. Easy to open but will stay shut without problems.
    Gary Beasley

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