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Thread: Pyro PMK fixer

  1. #1

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    Pyro PMK fixer

    Hello all,

    I'm thinking of mixing up some pyro PMK film developer (easier than i first thought)in the next few weeks and was wondering about what fixer to use. With pyro developers the film is very sensitive to acid (hence no stop bath, only water). It needs to be a non-hardening fixer and the only non - hardening fixer i can get my hands on is Ilfofix II. The problem is this fixer contains sodium thiosulphate which to me sounds pretty acidic, but might be ok. I'd like to circumnaviagte any potential problems as money is rather tight. Any indications as to what fixer (or any other advice on pyro) would be most helpful. and alas I don't have Gordon Hutchings Pyro book at the minute, unfortunately, and can't get my hands on kodak 24 fixer....

    thanks for any guidance or responses,

    ade.

  2. #2
    ann
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    sodium thiosulfate is hypo, or better know as fixer. I don't know what else is in the Ilforfix or if this fixer is the same as Ilford's Rapid fixer. We use Ilford's Rapid fixer for all film including PMK which contains ammonium thiosulfate but no hardner. As long as the ilforfix does not contain a hardner it would probably be ok. Perhaps Lee will chime in here and either confirm or correct my thoughts.

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    An alkaline fixer is ideal. You can get TF-4 from Photographer's Formulary, and Fine Art Photo Supply sells an alkaline fixer. You can also mix TF-2 or TF-3 from the formulas in Anchell's _Darkroom Cookbook_, and I think they are also in the _Film Developing Cookbook_.
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  4. #4
    lee
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    Chime Filter on...Ann has it correct. Kodak and Ilford's rapid fix is good and available. They are essentially the same fixer. Don't use the after fix soak. It creates too much stain in the base +fog areas and makes the neg more difficult to print through. Just fix and then into the wash.
    Chime filter off,

    lee\c

  5. #5
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    Ade,
    I knew you would get some good answers here and they confirmed what I had already mentioned. Good luck with your developing.

    gene
    gene LaFord


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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by ader
    ...this fixer contains sodium thiosulphate...
    Use just that, sodium thiosulfate. I've seen it recommended when
    a staining developer is used. For starters try 16 grams of the
    anhydrous in what ever amount of water is needed. That is
    the amount I recommend for one roll of Pan F+ 120. A
    faster film will likely require a little more.
    Of course it is one-shot.
    Dan

  7. #7
    Ole
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    Ilfofix is a neutral ammonium thiosulfate fixer. Use that, most home mixes are no better. In fact it's better than most, and lots better than "plain hypo".
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Ilfofix is a neutral ammonium thiosulfate fixer.
    Penta or anhydrous, neither of those two sodium thiosulfates
    will spoil. Preservatives and ph modifiers are added to the usuall
    off-the-shelf fixers.
    If used fresh, the ph neutral, unadulterated sodium
    thiosulfates will do all that a fixer can do. No need to add
    anything.
    To use fresh at processing time just spoon into the needed
    amount of water an appropriate amount of the salt. Dan

  9. #9
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    If used fresh, the ph neutral, unadulterated sodium
    thiosulfates will do all that a fixer can do. No need to add
    anything.
    No, they won't. Sodium thiosulfate is not recommended for some films (and papers), because it won't dissolve silver iodide. Ammonium thiosulfate will, as will sodium thiosulfate with added ammonium.

    What makes you think "unadulterated sodium thiosulfate" is neutral?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #10

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    [QUOTE=Ole]
    "Sodium thiosulfate is not recommended for some films
    (and papers), because it won't dissolve silver iodide."

    That is a complete falsehood. It is in fact the thiosulfate, be it
    sodium or ammonium, which complexes well with the halogens of
    silver. While the ammonium ion will complex well with the chloride and
    some what with the bromide, it has practically no affinity for the iodide.

    "What makes you think "unadulterated sodium thiosulfate" is neutral?"

    I've measured it a number of times. Most often it's ph measures 6.8.
    That puts it very slightly on the acid side of neutral.

    If you don't believe me give ammonium chloride alone a try. Dan

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