Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,697   Posts: 1,482,547   Online: 886
      
Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 31 to 34 of 34
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,260
    Unfortunately I'm not a member of Facebook so I can't really see any of your work. Was just curious that's all. I went back to the cookbook and it references you regarding an article you wrote for Photo Techniques in 1995. Are you a full time fine art photographer, or commercial photographer, or did/do you have another profession entirely?

    Sorry for asking these naive questions. I've been curious lately regarding how one goes about becoming a respected name on the technical side of the art without having been an engineer at one of the manufacturers. How you become a credible source, for example, on a particular subject. How did you end up writing articles on this stuff and getting them published?

    I'm trying to figure out if you first need the reputation as a fine artist in the field, which inevitably leads to people wanting to know "how you do it", or if you can come at it strictly from the scentific perspective.

    This all comes from the amount of testing I've gone through over the last few years. They are relatively simple tests designed to compare different films and present data and visual evidence. I have always found this to be lacking in the field, so that in making the choice between two comparable films, for example, one usually has to rely on vague anecdotal evidence from hobbyists and professionals, who often report conflicting observations. Obviously there is always a subjective element in photography, but it should not be as hard as it is to get a straight answer on certain fundamental characteristics.

    Anyhow sorry to throw the thread off. Take it as a compliment if nothing else

  2. #32
    Stephen Benskin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,196
    Michael,

    I went to USC for Cinema Production but found B&W still to be more interesting. Everything I know is self taught. I also worked in some of the best commercial photo labs in Los Angeles which gave me access and time to play.

    In my opinion, too many people are listened to and published simply because they are "good" photographers. Those that I tend to respect like my geek hero Lyod Jones it's about being right, accurate, and to have everything supported with evidence.

    For me, nothing beats the sensitometric approach to confirm the testing. When there are too many inaccuracies in testing you end up comparing apples to oranges. One common question when I worked in labs was is Film X more or less contrasty as Film Y? I'd tell them contrast is contrast. If you process them to the same contrast, they will be the same. I would test other labs from time to time. I'd ask them to process the film Normal (which was a sensitometric exposure). With one "professional" lab, their normal was around +2 1/2. If there was no way of knowing how they processed it, the average person would conclude that the film tended to be contrasty.
    Last edited by Stephen Benskin; 06-03-2011 at 01:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,260
    This is exaclty what I'm talking about. When I first started teaching myself seriously, I started the way I assume many people do, reading books by the big artistic names, technical magazines etc. But it is frustrating to discover much of this stuff is at best inaccurate or misleading, at worst outright wrong. Mix that with the million-and-one anecdotal claims and observations in forums, magazine articles, product reviews etc, and then finally throw in the vague descriptions by the manufacturers, and you have a recipe for never actually knowing which materials and procedures might be best suited to your own work without spending years and thousands of dollars doing your own flawed testing instead of taking pictures.

    Anyhow, food for thought. Thanks for sharing your background.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    198
    Images
    40
    Better spend most of the time taking pictures.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin