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  1. #11

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    Formalin is merely a solution of formaldehyde in water and a bit of alcohol. Formaldehyde is a gas so once the solution evaporates from the emulsion there is no residual protection against destructive agents such as fungus.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by georgegrosu View Post
    ...(cut)
    The conclusion is that the best is formalin (4% for 4 minutes).
    Perchlorethylene reduce contamination by mechanically removing the mold of film.
    Aquasan (5%) followed by washing with water gives a satisfactory result.
    Here is an article near you said above.
    http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub95/chap3.html „Disinfection”

    Note: there is no universal recipe for treatment of mold.
    Depending on the types existing mold on film, a recipe will work better or less effective.


    George
    George,
    Thanks, again, for your interesting comments and i will look into Aquasan as an option.
    cr frank

  3. #13
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    Guys;

    Formalin can attach to the gelatin just as if it were hardening the gelatin. This "poisons" the gelatin as far as the "bugs" are concerned and they shy away. If the gelatin is already infected then it acts as a disinfectant. Either way, the gelatin is cleared of any attraction to or infection by "bugs". It does not entirely evaporate.

    As for the spots that started this.... Well, there are so many things this could be I just cannot say offhand, but usually it takes quite a bit of time for "bugs" to create this level of damage. I would therefore suspect a chemical problem. My first observation is that the color is reddish. Iron contamination makes this type of blemish. Red dots. I had this problem until I put in a water filtration system. But, that is just one possible answer.

    PE

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Guys;

    (cut)
    As for the spots that started this.... Well, there are so many things this could be I just cannot say offhand, but usually it takes quite a bit of time for "bugs" to create this level of damage. I would therefore suspect a chemical problem. My first observation is that the color is reddish. Iron contamination makes this type of blemish. Red dots. I had this problem until I put in a water filtration system. But, that is just one possible answer.

    PE
    I'm sure there will be no definitive answer as to what this problem is. The negs were stored in a very hostile environment for a month.....high heat and humidity. I also live in a 100 year old house with less than perfect plumbing. Even though the water was filtered i have my doubts. My hope is to do what I can to prevent future problems.....at this point that sounds like distilled water and Formalin just for good measure.
    Thanks for all the great info.
    charles
    Last edited by cr frank; 06-28-2011 at 06:51 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    cr frank

  5. #15
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    cr frank, Aquasan is a commercial industrial product. He is less efficient than formalin, but does not smell so bad.
    Send me an email address where they can send you the scanned article.
    George

  6. #16
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    Charles;

    With high heat and humidity, with or without bugs, film will tend to stick together. I believe that if they were not stuck together, then the humidity or the heat was not as high as you think. Generally this type of damage (heat and humidity alone) give irregular patterns of stuck negatives. Add bugs to that and you get softening of gelatin due to bug action. And remember that the original silver metal and hardener will aid in resisting bugs.

    I prefer an alternative actor here. But, I may be way off. If formalin alone removes this problem, it was probably bugs. Often, formalin can dislodge the bugs (if any) and still leave damaged film, but just colorless spots.

    PE

  7. #17

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    The film was stored in PrintFile sleeves in three ring binders. Packed in cardboard boxes....i've always wondered how "archival" those sleeves were ??
    cr frank

  8. #18
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    Almost all of my negatives are stored that way. Some have been there for many years. Stored right with them are contact sheets of the negatives. This is for color and B&W in several formats.

    PE

  9. #19

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    That's good to know....
    cr frank

  10. #20

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    To add to my previous post that formalin provides no protection from mold. I have six sets of color slides ruined by mold. The mold hyphae are clearly visible to the naked eye. The slides were commercially processed when a formaldehyde stabilizer was part of the color process.

    As far as real bugs are concerned, IIRC, the worst pest is the carpet beetle. This insect is the bane of museums. It appears to be rather general in its eating habits.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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