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  1. #21
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    As far as real bugs are concerned, IIRC, the worst pest is the carpet beetle. This insect is the bane of museums. It appears to be rather general in its eating habits.
    Can you please elaborate?

    Until last October I had my slides processed by a professional laboratory, framed and delivered in plastic boxes, and I kept them in those plastic boxes. No problem so far.

    Since last October I develop my film by myself. I keep them in glassine paper sheets inside a ring binder. Worse, most of the time this ring binder is on a bed (with a woollen blanket, I don't sleep there) open to let me easily reach each sheet.

    Your post raised some worries regarding this carpet beetle in particular, and small insects in general. Plastic cases were certainly an effective barrier against insects. Ring binders are probably not.

    Should I put some insect killer in my cupboard, such as naphthalene? Is there any long-term risk for film?

    (When I am rich I will certainly buy some dedicated cupboard, specifically designed for film storage. At the moment I'll to make do with what I have).
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  2. #22

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    According to articles I read in Modern Photography (defunct since 1996 or so) it’s not the adult insects that are the problem. It’s their larvae. The critters love Kodachrome in particular (I’ve no idea why). They excavate irregular channels in the gelatin right down to the base.

    The Modern Photography articles showed close-up photos of damaged Kodachrome slides that matched some of mine.

    The only way I’ve been able to reliably prevent fungus (or mold or mildew, whichever it really is) from growing on films is to store the films in Printfile pages in a sealed container with a generous supply of freshly-charged silica gel. The Watertight equipment cases sold by Calumet Photographic (similar to Pelican and Doskosil) have a neoprene seal to keep out water and humid air. It also keeps out insects and their larvae.

    I remove the foam padding to maximize the useable volume and add a 750-gram silica gel canister that keeps the interior desiccated. The silica gel canister can be recharged every several years by baking it in an oven at 300F (about 149C) for 2 hours. The canister can be replaced into the case as soon as it’s cool.

    Film stored in air conditioned buildings or in dry environments might never develop mold or fungus due to the moderate humidity. But films that must live in areas of periodic high humidity need extra protection. Insects and their larvae can go pretty much anywhere except a sealed container.

  3. #23
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Carpet beetles and their larvae do not prefer film for a feast. So, by the time you see damage from this insect and others, and by the time you see mold, mildew, fungus .. whatnot damage by anything like this, you will see serious damage to other things first. For example, you will probably see mold on walls or on wood surfaces, you will have mold on clothes along with mildew and etc.

    So, those that suspect damage to film must look elsewhere to see if there is "collateral damage" going on first, as the film is not the primary attack point, nor the entry point. A damp basement with film stored in it will first show mold on walls and then on film. The mold creeps in via windows, vents and in damp spots and then spreads as it produces spores. It does not, by some miracle, appear suddenly on film. The same goes for carpet beetles. If you have them, then you probably also have a spider problem as the spiders are attracted indoors by the same route as the beetles.

    So, if you have NO OTHER DAMAGE, then it is probably NOT mold, mildew, bacteria or carpet beetles.

    A case in point is my own. I have an old suitcase filled with negatives nearly 100 years old. Recently, I found one side of it (near the wall) in our basement covered with mold. Inside, the negatives were totally unharmed. Boxes of negatives in another room were unharmed as well. Wiping the suitcase with Lysol was effective in removing the mold.

    PE

  4. #24

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    Diapositivo,

    Carpet beetles larvae will munch on textiles, they will even chew on synthetic blends containing some natural fiber. They can eat the emulsion off photographic materials. I have seen photographs of the damage. I forget at what museum/library this occured. As PE mentioned they do prefer other materials if given a choice. You might want to contact a large museum or the Library of Congress as to what measures to use. Anything you use must be safe toward film and prints. Here in the southern US we must contend with palmetto bugs which can do very serious damge. They are sort of a super roach 1-1/4 inches long. Many people use Franklin Roach Tablets. They contain boric acid with an attractant. They do a good job of killing palmetto bugs. Would these work for other insects? I really don't know.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 06-30-2011 at 11:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #25
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    When the mold came on a film there is no treatment that can permanently eliminate these fungi. Treatment with various solutions (eg formalin) of films infected with mold for a time holding back the development of these microorganisms. After this period (smaller or larger depending on storage conditions) and mold growth on the film begins.
    By 1980 we used recipes with sodium pentachlorophenol for the prevention and removal of fungi:
    1. For prevention:
    • sodium pentachlorophenol ………0.3 g;
    • ethanol ...........................................20 ml;
    • watter .............................................80 ml.
    2. For removal:
    • sodium pentachlorophenol ………1 g;
    • ethanol ...........................................20 ml;
    • watter .............................................80 ml.
    Sodium pentachlorophenol is a highly toxic substance that I worked once. I am sure it is really very toxic.
    By 1988 we was informed about a very serious accident with this substance (in Czechoslovakia) and then never used us.
    George

  6. #26

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    <offtopic>Can modern C-41 and E-6 films (after late 1990s) still use the stabiliser as opposed to the final rinse now used?</offtopic>

  7. #27
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    Ricardo;

    I have summarized this so often, I really hate to post it again when you could search the answer... BUT....

    ALL E6 films need formalin and can use a formalin stabilzer, but the process has changed to place the formalin earlier in the process (the pre-bleach). All C41 films can use a formalin stailizer. C41 films after about 2000 or so use a new stabilizer that will allow fading in older C41 films. So you can use old formalin stabilizer with ALL color films, but C41 films after about 2000 can work with the new final rinse. No E6 or old C41 should be used with a Final Rinse product.

    This information is also summarized on Photo Net in their MYTHS articles which I wrote.

    PE

  8. #28
    RPC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian C View Post
    According to articles I read in Modern Photography (defunct since 1996 or so)...
    Just for the record I have an issue of Modern Photography dated July 1989 which says it is the last issue.

    RPC

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    No E6 or old C41 should be used with a Final Rinse product.

    This information is also summarized on Photo Net in their MYTHS articles which I wrote.

    PE
    I suppose you mean: No old E6 or C41 should be used with a Final Rinse product.

    I searched for the MYTHS article on photo.net, and I found this:

    http://photo.net/learn/color_myths

    and I am going to study it word by word.

    I think a "frequently referred posts, articles, and general reference source" should be add to APUG, probably inside the Articles section, because sometime it is not easy to dig inside APUG and find an answer.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  10. #30
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    I still have a question for which I found no answer so far.

    There is no pre-bleach in the C-41 process. I suppose there is no formalin in the C-41 if one does not use an E-6 stabilizer.

    My C-41 kit has a final bath, which is called "stabilizer", and which contains a different fungicide: 1,2 benzoisothiazolin-3-on.

    The question is: would this C-41 stabilizer be safe to use with E-6 films?

    The question might appear stupid, but I wonder why Rollei / compard don't provide a formalin-based stabilizer, and I fear that they don't do it because there is some adverse effect of formalin with C-41 film.

    The reason I ask this is that I would like to keep only one container for stabilizer, and use it for all kind of films. I would use my E-6 stabilizer for both E-6 and C-41 (and this is just confirmed to be fine) and when my E-6 stabilizer is over, I could mix some C-41 stabilizer and use it with both E-6 and C-41 films (this would be fine with C-41 films but I am not so sure about E-6 film).
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

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