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  1. #1

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    Formalin to prevent fungus

    At the suggestion of forum members I am trying Formalin to prevent fungus forming on negs. I have in hand a bottle of Formalin MS. I am looking for help with proper use of this product. Such as correct dilution and duration of treatment. Any suggestions are appreciated.
    thanks,
    charles
    cr frank

  2. #2

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    I can't help with that particular question since I've only used formalin as a gelatin hardener, but please make sure you use all safety precautions like good ventilation or a fume hood. That stuff is nasty bad.

  3. #3
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    My E-6 stabilizer contains formalin at 4,75% and is diluted 1 + 49 so the final concentration is 0,095 % (1:1000). Dilution should better be made in demineralized water. This is the very last bath the film sees, so if you need adding something else (hardener, maybe antistatic, whatever) do it in the same bath.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  4. #4
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    You do not need formalin for B&W prints or negatives, as the silver metal itself is an antifungicide and bacteriostat. It is only used in color processes due to all of the yummy organics present and no residual silver if the process is done right.

    For color, use about 3 - 10 ml of 37% formalin / liter of water. This is what I use and what we used to use in color processes.

    PE

  5. #5

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    27ml of 37% Formaldehyde in 1 ltr. destilled water is exactly 1% Formaline. I thought that normally 0,5% -1% is used for this. But due to the answer of PE it seems to be it can be even less.
    My favorite store: http://www.fotohuisrovo.nl

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    You do not need formalin for B&W prints or negatives, as the silver metal itself is an antifungicide and bacteriostat. It is only used in color processes due to all of the yummy organics present and no residual silver if the process is done right.

    For color, use about 3 - 10 ml of 37% formalin / liter of water. This is what I use and what we used to use in color processes.

    PE
    PE,
    Thanks for your response. This suggestion to use Formalin was offered in reference to a recent thread "a darkroom conundrum". In this thread are attachments which show what i am dealing with. Could you take a look at these and offer a opinion? Maybe this is not fungus after all.....?
    charles
    cr frank

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    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Do you have a URL Frank?

    PE

  8. #8
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    It is true that silver is a good antibacterial, but gelatin of film is a very good food and more for fungus.
    In „Actes du Symposium Technique Mixte –JTS Paris 2000” is a presentation of „traitement des films cinematografiques contamines par les moisissures” by Malalanirina Rakotonirainy, Fabien Fohrer, and Bertrand Lavédrine.
    15 products are presented to treat mold.
    The conclusion is that the best is formalin (4% for 4 minutes).
    Perchlorethylene reduce contamination by mechanically removing the mold of film.
    Aquasan (5%) followed by washing with water gives a satisfactory result.
    Here is an article near you said above.
    http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub95/chap3.html „Disinfection”

    Note: there is no universal recipe for treatment of mold.
    Depending on the types existing mold on film, a recipe will work better or less effective.

    George

  9. #9
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    B&W film is very resistant to bugs, but it is not impossible to get an "infecton" going on or in your film if conditions are poor enough. Such "infections" are rare enough that they don't trouble most of us. But, Formalin is a good treatment for it, as you say, and a chlorinated hydrocarbon is good for removal.

    That is why color stabilizers contain Formalin and why film cleaners used to be chlorinated hydrocarbons.

    This has been known for over 100 years, so there is nothing new about it.

    PE

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Do you have a URL Frank?

    PE
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/9...conundrum.html

    here are the scans of the film in question..

    thanks for your input..

    charles
    cr frank

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