Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,678   Posts: 1,482,155   Online: 1068
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35
  1. #11
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,567
    Images
    1
    I do not find HC-110 to produce negs any granier than D-76 myself. I use it mostly dilution H to get longer times and help with consistency. Frankly, HC-110 or D-76 are both awesome developers with unlimited potential, just got to work with them to get what you want.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  2. #12
    artonpaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    325
    Images
    135
    I always thought HC-110 B produced a tighter grain than D-76 1:1. It does have a bit less acutance. These days, the new version of Tri-X calls for a 3.5 minute developing time for dilution B. That is too short. A high dilution would be the way to go, but I have yet to try it.

  3. #13
    masimix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    64
    I have used HC-110 for about two years now, since I bought two bottles for half price, and I have probably developed about 150+ films, and the first bottle isn't empty yet! It is very convenient, i use a 20ml syringe to extract the concentrate, and i don't bother with A, B, H or G, I just use it 1+60, 1+90 or even 1+120 (A. Adams used this). It is great for contrast control, I use Ilfords Pan F+ in 120, and I can control contrast by using dilutions like 1+90 or 1+120 with this film. It might be grainier than D-76, but it isn't an issue with 120 size Pan F+ or FP4+ (I use 1+60 or H for this). HP5+ in 135 has some grain, indeed, but that's just charming.

    Edit: I expose Pan F+ at 32-40 ISO, and FP4+ at 100 ISO, the tonal range is wonderful.

  4. #14
    2F/2F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,008
    Images
    4
    IME, HC-110 is very slightly contrastier, very slightly lower in speed, and quite a bit less grainy.

    D-76 is cheaper if used to the last drop. It is much cheaper if you mix it from scratch. And it costs almost nothing per roll if you replenish.

    I prefer HC-110 because it is absolutely consistent, and there is never any waste.

    I use it mainly at dilution B. Often I will pull or aim for soft negatives with dilution H. (H is the commonly-referred to letter for an unofficial dilution that is twice as diluted as dil. B) At dilution H, I find it gaining some graininess, losing some contrast, and gaining some speed, so it looks very much like D-76 IMO (though still less grainy than D-76 at 1:1).

    I mix up small batches of stock. Others like to inject the syrup directly to make working solution. I prefer making it from stock for a few reasons, which I have mentioned in past posts. But both ways work.

    Both should be decanted and kept away from oxygen as much as possible.

    I'd suggest HC-110 as a standard developer for just about everyone except for the extremely budget conscious. In that case, I would suggest mixing D-23 or D-76 from scratch, and/or replenishing.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  5. #15
    kand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Sydney
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7

    HC 110!

    HC 110 gets my vote of those two.

    But I prefer ID11plus myself

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,015
    I'm so used to D-76 that I really can't comment. A while back, PE posted a link to a chart comparing Kodak developers in terms of grain, sharpness, speed, and something else. I can't find the link right now, but HC-110 came out as not a champ in any category but a pretty decent compromise in general. Xtol came in best in both grain and sharpness, and D-76 scored well in grain and speed, as I recall.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    468
    What is the minimum mL of HC110 concentrate to develop a roll of film?

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    655

    1:3 you say

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    B is the standard recommended dilution, but as you say people use it in all sorts of dilutions. Some people prefer to use it more dilute than B even with normal development since it is easier to control contrast. The very dilute formulations are typically for reduced agitation/compensation methods. I have not heard of many people using it for full stand. For compensation methods, there are other general purpose developers that will work just as well if not better in some cases (less speed loss).

    There is not much preventing you from using dilute formulations of most any general purpose developer the same way. In that respect there is nothing particularly special about HC-110. It is just convenient that's all.

    It is hard to compare it with D76 (or any other developer) because there are variables like agitation, dilution, development time etc that have an impact on image characteristics. But generally, expect slightly more grain and slightly less speed with HC110 compared to D76. The differences are not huge. HC110 is not an acutance developer as some people claim. It gives more acutance when diluted and when agitation is reduced, but D76 will do that also. In fact D76 at 1+3 is a very sharp developer.
    Michael,

    What is your starting time for this D76 at 1:3 thing you've mentioned? Assuming 68 degrees F., three inversions every 30 s., etc.

    thanks,
    s-a

  9. #19
    Lee L's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,237
    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    I'm so used to D-76 that I really can't comment. A while back, PE posted a link to a chart comparing Kodak developers in terms of grain, sharpness, speed, and something else. I can't find the link right now, but HC-110 came out as not a champ in any category but a pretty decent compromise in general. Xtol came in best in both grain and sharpness, and D-76 scored well in grain and speed, as I recall.
    Here's the chart:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/attachmen...0072hc.gif.att

    According to this chart from Kodak, Xtol has finer grain, greater film speed, and better acutance than either D-76 or HC-110. HC-110 produces finer grain, but lower film speed and lower acutance than D-76.

    This is with Xtol and D-76 undiluted and HC-110 at Dilution B.

    Lee

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    251
    Images
    29
    I have a half full bottle of HC-110 (still in the original plastic bottle) that's about two years old now and it works great. I use it only for Tri-X. I was suggested a dilution of 1:50 at eight minutes. This works great for me as I can shoot indoors and still maintain decent highlight detail whenever a window is in my shot. I don't use Tri-X much hence why my bottle is half full after two years. The syrup lasts forever I've heard.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin