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  1. #21

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    I think most people do it in 'portrait orientation.'

    I was a commercial diver for many years, that means working blind most of the time in rather dreadful conditions. The more body contact you have with an object the more tactile sensing and orientation you maintain.

    With the holder in portrait orientation lying flat on a table in front of you angle it upwards 45 deg. flap at top, now bring the bottom (dark slide end) in to make contact with and resting on (depending on the extent of beer consumed on average) your tummy. Right hand holds the film with notches upper right and *I* use my left hand to keep the flap open with my index finger while my thumb rests just below the film track opening and helps guide the left edge of the film into the track.

    Better sensing, orientation and leverage.
    Imitation cameras come with big egos, real cameras do not include accessories.

  2. #22
    bpm32's Avatar
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    I don't think I did a very good job of explaining myself...

    I lay the film holder flat on a table in a portrait position. The flap is at the far end, the slide will pull out toward my stomach. I pull the slide out toward my stomach and flip the flap away from me with my left hand. I then grasp the film and orient it in the same portrait orientation, again flat to the table. At that point, shouldn't the notches be at the "top right"... or the far end, right corner? When I'm finished sliding the sheet in, the notches, as I look down on the film holder sitting flat on the table, are at the far end right hand corner of the film holder. I'm I doing this wrog? I didn't think my photos looked that bad!

    I think this is the same thing JD Morgan just described.

    So, if I'm loading this correctly, the emulsion side would be up at that point. Therefore, when I pull the film out, I simply pull it straight out and lay it on the screen, which is again, in portrait orientation. At that point, the notches would be in the "upper right" hand corner, or the far end corner on the right.

    Does it sound like I'm doing it right? I don't think I'm laying the emulsion face down on the screen, but who knows now.

  3. #23
    lee
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    just to add to the confusion, I load film in the holder with the notches on the right in the flap area. I hold the holder with the flap away from me and the dark slide toward me.

    lee\c

  4. #24

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    To confirm last question. Yes, you are doing it right.

  5. #25

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    I position my holders in landscape orientation, but with the end flap to the left and the darkslides pulled out to the right. I pick up the film with my left hand and insert it with the notches in the upper left corner. And I'm right handed. This seems completely natural to me.

    So there! Takes all kinds!

  6. #26
    fil
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    Cibachrome tube?

    Back to the original question..

    I'm curious how you are using a Cibachrome tube at all for film. I received a couple yesterday, and they are absolutely smooth inside. My other recycled print drums all have ribs which keep the film backing away enough to let the antihalation coating get removed by a presoak. Does the fiberglass somehow lift the film away enough to do this?

    Also, how do you keep the 4x5 negatives separated and affixed during development? All I can imagine is to lay the negatives out on a single piece of fiberglass, roll it up and put it in. But then I can't see how the film would stick when dry as it would be when you put it in.

    Maybe I *can* use these drums with film developing after all!

    cheers
    ----
    good light

  7. #27
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    Well, now that you mention it... maybe this is where I'm running into troubles.... seeing how there aren't any ribs in there. This grid only shows up horizontally as an inch (or so) wide strip halfway up the long side of the negative. When I curl the negative and screen and slide it into the tube, I do feel like the fact that the neg wants to uncurl puts a lot of pressure at the same point where the grid ultimately shows. Now I'm wondering if it's creating so much pressure that the presoak can't get in there and clear that antihalation layer. It's clear everywhere else.

    I may switch to presoaking in trays and see how that works. Thanks for the tip... even if it was inadvertent!

    As for developing, I only develop one sheet at a time in the tubes. It's not speedy, but it's all I've got. One of these days I'd like to make my own tubes, but the time just hasn't presented itself yet. Is this what you meant?

  8. #28
    fil
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    Quote Originally Posted by bpm32
    As for developing, I only develop one sheet at a time in the tubes. It's not speedy, but it's all I've got. One of these days I'd like to make my own tubes, but the time just hasn't presented itself yet. Is this what you meant?
    Not having the time or patience to do only one 4x5 sheet at once, I use Unicolor or Beseler print drums and the technique described in:

    http://www.largeformatphotography.info/unicolor/

    This works great for me. I was just trying to speed the process up and had these Cibachrome drums...

    cheers
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    good light

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by fil
    Back to the original question..

    I'm curious how you are using a Cibachrome tube at all for film. I received a couple yesterday, and they are absolutely smooth inside.
    I've always used an 8x10 ciba drum for developing 4x5 and 8x10 B&W film. For 4x5, I put two sheets in the bottom, emulsion facing inward. The sheets have the 5" side against the end cap of the tube, and I'll put 2 sheets end to end, so the 4" sides are opposed against each other.

    I do seperate the sheets a bit, so there is a gap of about 1" between the ends of the sheets. I then process with 75 ml of chemistry for each step, do a few passes of water at the end as a primary wash, then pull the sheets out and tray wash them.

    I've never had a problem with any anti halation layers not coming off, or the film moving around.

    I've have had problems trying to do 4 - 4x5 sheets at a time, the film will overlap then, but to a surprisingly small degree.

  10. #30
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    respectfully:

    jesus, just grab 6-8 sheets and do then in a tray- one sheet at a time, fiberglass screens, whatta waste of time.

    Matt

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