Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,587   Posts: 1,545,858   Online: 1148
      
Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 77
  1. #51

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,846
    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    jthe robusto coffee that i used for my developer is the ugly cousin
    of arabica coffee ... it is not liked by connoisseurs .. it is not shade grown &C ...
    i wonder if it is grown in the same way that the more expensive "connoisseur-coffee" is grown,
    in the plantations you mention...
    You are right about robusto coffee. The only thing going for it is that it has twice the caffeine as the arabica. A friend of mine used to say that coffee doesn't have to taste good, it just has to work.

    Since the useful life of a coffee tree is around seven years, the practice was just to move on to another portion of the forest and plant anew. Thankfully, the growers have become a bit more responsible.

    Have you ever considered the Beutler developer. The working developer is highly dilute so that it has little effect on the environment. It uses just three ingredients; metol, sodium sulfite, and sodium carbonate. I used it for years as my general purpose film developer when I was a struggling student with little money.

    When used for prints does a coffee developer cause any staining with FB papers? This is something I've wondered about.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #52
    Adrian Twiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Wigan (oop North) United Kingdom
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    612
    Images
    10
    I have been very satisfied with a) Liquid Dektol (actually Kodak Polymax) and b) Ilford PQ universal (but I would not use it for film). For cold tones I would also recommend Tetenal Dokumol.

    In powdered developers my favourite is Ansco 130 (wonderful print colour and tone and it lasts for ages) and Dektol (a nice neutral/cold tone).

    If you want to get into home mixed brews you should get a copy of the Darkroom Cookbook by Steve Anchell. It's packed with lots of practical advice.

  3. #53

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,356
    Blog Entries
    6
    Images
    50
    thanks for the buetler suggestion jerry --- it sounds like d23 but soda instead of borax ...

    the java seems to do me well, i mix 1.5L of it and it lasts more than 4 months
    and over a hundred prints & 4x5 sheets ... ( can't complain ) .. it was still going strong
    and i got nervous and split it and added another 750cc to some seasoned developer and it lasted another 3+ months.
    i haven't noticed any staining when i use it with paper. it takes about 2x the time for the print to complete
    and paper negatives like it as well...

    the sumatra i am using doesn't taste too bad. it has a nice full body and floral notes
    i take a slurp once in a while if i am brewing some for the darkroom
    ( i roast it cinnamon ( barely ) and because it is old and some beans have
    a higher moisture content than the others some beans are a little darker. )
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  4. #54
    jelke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    192

  5. #55
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,289
    Images
    301
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    How do you folks who replenish LPD do this? Do you add a measured amount of fresh solution per print?
    From a gallon kit take 1/3 of the liquid and add water to make one gallon. That's your working solution.

    For the remaining 2/3 of the concentrate, add water to make one gallon. That's your replenisher.

    Add 300ml replenisher per 30 8x10 prints, and top up the working solution to a full gallong at the end of your printing session if needed.

    When you start a new batch, take the spent developer to dilute the 1/3 gallon of fresh concentrate to make new working solution.

    Ethol will send you the instructions in the mail if you ask for it.

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #56
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,894
    Thanks for the information. Interesting, but I don't know how practical that would be for me. If I get to print every week or two I'll be doing good.

  7. #57
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,368
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    435
    Roger-

    if you only print every couple weeks, then Ansco 130 is the stuff for you- even at working strength, it lasts for weeks at a time, and although it does eventually exhaust, of course, it never seems to. I remember putting something like 30 8x10s and nearly a dozen 16x20s through one gallon of the working strength (1:3) in a single session, coming back three weeks later and printing again and it seemed like it was still developing full tonal range on my prints in the same time (3 minutes). I had one batch going in my Nova slot processor for two months, replenishing as volume was consumed by prints and/or evaporation. Great stuff!

  8. #58
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,277
    Images
    148
    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Twiss View Post
    I have been very satisfied with a) Liquid Dektol (actually Kodak Polymax) and b) Ilford PQ universal (but I would not use it for film). For cold tones I would also recommend Tetenal Dokumol.
    D72/Dektol was designed first and foremost to be a film developer for plates sheet films, later it was used for papers as well. For some years it wasn't recommended in the UK for papers where D163 was in use instead.

    PQ Universal is an excellent film developer giving good fine grain, sharpness and tonality, ideally it needs dilutiong 1+19 or even 1+29. The disadvantage like D72/Dektol) is because of it's carbonate content it doesn't keep as well and does lose activity, not enough to be a problem with prints but in a more dilute negative developer it may cause issues of under development.

    PQ Universal is still recommended for Ilford's Ortho Plus, but Ilford used to publish times for all their films and when I had a commercial darkroom we use it for a lot of negative processing. M&B's (now Champion) equivalent Suprol was widely used at one time for commercail negative processing.

    Ian

  9. #59

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    local
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,356
    Blog Entries
    6
    Images
    50
    hi roger

    scott is on the money with the ansco 130
    i am using stock that i mixed over a year ago
    and it is still great ...

    some say it lasts for about 30 days in an open tray dilute/working strength ...

    have fun!
    john
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  10. #60

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Milepost 30 Hudson Divison NY
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    66
    I used LPD for years but wanting to change to a developer with a better environmental foot print I switched over to Eco-Pro's ascorbate based paper developer.

    The results I get with MGWT are outstanding. I am amazed by the wide range of tones in the prints. The developer life is phenominal as the quart of stock solution has lasted over 8 months in its partially filled original container.

    To make a working solution the stock is diluted 1:9 which makes it very economical and is very similar to the results I obtained with LPD. It works well with either warm or cold tone papers and can be diluted to 1:14 for warmer or colder tones.

Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin