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  1. #1

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    Help me identify this Agfa film...

    I bought this rusty can of film for peanuts a couple of days ago. (crappy pic is attached)

    I only understood that it's cine stock, probably B&W ortochromatic (since it says "Handle in red light only" on the side), but I don't know any more than that.

    The box is still sealed, and I don't currently possess a bulk loader, so I can't test it just yet.

    Does anyone know any specs, such as approximate age and ISO value? Would it be any good to shoot or should I just keep it on my shelf?

    Thanks.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_9531_1024x768.jpg  

  2. #2
    edp
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    The "Berlin SO 36" postcode puts it before 1961. http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berlin_SO_36

    And if that rusty hole goes all the way through the lid I dare say the film inside is completely fogged.

  3. #3

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    The label shows Agfa as being part of the "I G Farben" group, of which it became one of the constituent companies in 1925. "I G Farben" was dissolved by the allies at the end of World War II, following its activities in wartime production, so the film would have been manufactured some time within that 20-year-period?

  4. #4
    edp
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    IG Farben was put into liquidation in 1952, and still exists in that state today.

    I would guess this film was made some time between 1952 and 1961.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the amazingly quick replies. That rusty part doesn't have holes in it (yet), as far as I could inspect.

    So, 50+ years, huh? I guess a month or two in the fridge wont hurt it any more than it's hurt now.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by edp View Post
    IG Farben was put into liquidation in 1952, and still exists in that state today.

    I would guess this film was made some time between 1952 and 1961.
    Yes, it still exists in law, but I G Farben definitely was not an active manufacturer after the end of WW2....one of its less attractive products during the war was Zyklon B poison gas....this and other activities resulted in war crime prosecutions by the allies. So pre-1945 manufacture, for sure.

    After the war Agfa resumed production as two separate entities, one in West Germany, the other in the Soviet zone (which eventually changed to using the Orwo brand name). The two main factories then were in Leverkusen and Wolfen respectively. (An interesting read, if you google I G Farben and the Agfa/Orwo stories.)
    Last edited by railwayman3; 07-12-2011 at 09:21 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #7
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    "I only understood that it's cine stock, probably B&W ortochromatic"

    The word Kine is still in use for 35mm camera film, it doesn't necessarily mean it's film for a cine camera. Remember that pre-WWII the 35mm Exacta was the Kine Exacta.

    EFKE still call their 35mm films KB 25, KB 50, KB 100 etc, the K standing for Kine from it's Dr Schleussner / Adox German roots.

    Ian

  8. #8
    edp
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    I thought KB was 'Kleinbild' (i.e. 35mm), together with R for Rollfilm and PL for Planfilm.

  9. #9
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edp View Post
    I thought KB was 'Kleinbild' (i.e. 35mm), together with R for Rollfilm and PL for Planfilm.
    You're entirely right, I'm used to the term Kine in early adverts for Leica, Contax etc early 35mm cameras.

    Ian

  10. #10

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    I'm curious about any inner wrapping. Certainly it won't be in a black plastic bag. Did they use waxed paper in those days? Or was it "going commando" inside that can?
    - Bill Lynch

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