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  1. #1
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Marbles for oxygen displacement

    I regularly use glass marbles in clear, plastic juice containers to displace the empty air space (with either BW or color developer) and the result is literally indefinite preservation of developer (as long as the solution is fully up to the rim of the container). These bottles are really airtight (like glass) but I am wondering if, in this high tech age with miracle plastics, there are lighter 'solutions'.

    Plastic packing peanuts I fear are not fully impervious to chemical saturation. Do you know if this is true or do you know if there are other, even 'creative' ways for such physical displacement? I already know about the method of spraying anti-oxydent and do not wish to employ that method. The marbles work great but the bottle becomes quite heavy when full of marbles. (For really small quantities I use tiny 50ml liquour bottles that I find sometimes on the streets.)

    Thank you for any info you can impart. - David Lyga.

  2. #2
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    You could find plastic bottles for mineral water, carbonated drinks etc. in PET (or PETE, is marked as plastic #1) and also find bottle caps in the same material. This plastic is not permeable to oxygen. You can squeeze the bottles to let the air out.

    An alternative could be the Kaiser "bellows" bottles, but due to their shape they appear to be not easy to clean thoroughly and in any case the bottle is compressible only up to a certain amount. Mineral water bottles are more compressible. You could even mix the two criteria, when the bottle is squeezed a lot, in order not to squeeze it too much (so that it remains standing on its base, for instance) you might insert some marbles.

    Fabrizio
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  3. #3
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Yes, Diapositivo, the plastic is the same whether for water or juice, but the 'squeezability' of these bottles is rather limited and can crimp and even damage the bottle if done to excess. But, you are correct, limited squeezing is OK with these. (This type of plastic is really a major improvement against the older, brown plastic bottles which 'breathe'.) - David Lyga

  4. #4

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    Consider getting amber glass pharmacy bottles that hold 16oz. After mixing your gal. of developer fill the smaller bottles which often have graduate indicators. No need for marbles that need cleaning and storage. Label and date the bottles which being smaller are more easily kept in a cool dark area. You might even find a pharmacist who has some empties that would otherwise have been discarded. Uline sells them 12@$1.75 and I would guess that a scientific or container supply in Philadelphia would also have them.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #5
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Thank you, but glass, for this purpose, is no better than the convenient brittle, plastic bottles, Jeffrey. This plastic bottle is available in 500ml or even 300ml, so pint size glass that you mention is not 'better'. Even with your advice the airspace would still be there as the solution is used. Even though I posted this in BW (because so many more eyes read this forum) my concern is primarily with the more vulnerable color developer. As I already stated, marbles and the plastic bottles allow me to keep the developer literally indefinitely. I am looking for an alternative to the glass marbles (in terms of a lighter material). Thank you. - David Lyga

  6. #6

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    500ml plastic water bottles run $1-2 for 12 on sale complete with water compared to $1.75 each plus shipping for glass ones. That works out to 1/10 the cost and the plastic ones are squeezable. There is no need for amber bottles for storing chemistry unless you are putting the chems in a sunny shop window.
    Bob

  7. #7

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    If you could find hollow plastic balls of the size that would fit your bottles you could reduce the weight. I use the amber glass bottles with B&W chemistry that lasts at least six months although I most often use it long before that. I've had the same bottles for more than thirty years.

    Jeff

  8. #8
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    AHH, the hollow impervious balls or (other configurations small enough to fit in the mouth of the bottle) would be ideal, Jeffrey. I just wonder if anyone can be more definitive as to an actual, practical substance that is not chemically reactive. - David Lyga.

  9. #9

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    Hollow balls won't work, they will float right out thru the opening. Solid pete plastic balls might work, their density would be around 1.4 gm/ml. That should be dense enough for most photo chemicals.
    Bob

  10. #10

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    David,

    Check with Hartford Technologies 1(860)571-3602.

    Jeff

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