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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo_Gaz View Post
    I didn't mistake black for clear at all. If you're referring to the earlier scan I was referring to where you can see clear film at the part where I had cut it from the rest.
    I think the initial confusion was "beginning of the roll" vs. "end of the roll".

    All of the frames you shoot before the frame counter reads "1" are throwaway frames. They will be completely exposed, or, as in your scan, half exposed, and will be dark/opaque. A frame or two at the end of the roll will be unexposed/clear. All of that is completely normal. Any completely dark or clear frames in between those two areas are issues with the camera and/or operator.

  2. #52
    Photo_Gaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moose10101 View Post
    All of the frames you shoot before the frame counter reads "1" are throwaway frames. They will be completely exposed, or, as in your scan, half exposed, and will be dark/opaque. A frame or two at the end of the roll will be unexposed/clear. All of that is completely normal. Any completely dark or clear frames in between those two areas are issues with the camera and/or operator.
    Thank you, I shall expect this in the future. When I loaded the camera I wound the film on until it reached the number "1" on the exposure counter window. With the above in mind, am I to continue to wind on another 2 exposures to get in to the part of the film that is usable?

    I apologise if I come across as ignorant, while this isn't the case I AM trying to ask seemingly very basic questions so I do not continue to the make the same basic errors in the future. I do not want to wind the film on to "1" only to take some amazing photographs to then find that they are in the unusable section of the filmw with the expectation of having a full 36 exposures when I purchase a film that says it has 36 exposures on it.

    If I can understand that this is the fact with all film of this nature then I can work around it-similarly with the other end of the film.

  3. #53

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    I salute you, Photo_Gaz, for persistence and determination. Keep asking questions and you shall be answered, though the more carefully written and precise the question the better the answer.

    Most 35mm cameras have counters arranged so that the two shots you make to advance the film past the exposed leader will bring the counter to Number 1.

    So I suggest for your next roll, you make those first two shots with the lens cap on, so there will be no confusion about what you (and possibly we) will be seeing. Then make a note of the subject matter of photo Number 1, 2, and 3.

    Then when you develop the roll, you'll see where the photos begin, and you'll have a procedure that you can follow to guarantee yourself getting unobscured shots at the beginning of the roll.

    At the end of the roll (say a "36 exposure" roll), you'll feel some strong resistance as you advance the film around Number 35 or 36 or 37. Do not force the film advance at that point (or around 23, 24, or 25 just in case you actually put a 24 exposure roll in). Rewind the film at that point.

    Likewise, when you get to shots Number 33, 34, and the last ones, make a note of your subject matter of each shot, so you'll know what you got and what you should have gotten.

    When loading for development, cut the film off the film canister reel just a fraction of an inch, say a centimetre, before the tape. If you do this, there will usually be about 3 to 5 centimetres of blank film at the end (clear, no image, but with edge numbers or edge film type markings, more or less).

  4. #54
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo_Gaz View Post
    I apologise if I come across as ignorant, while this isn't the case I AM trying to ask seemingly very basic questions so I do not continue to the make the same basic errors in the future.
    Photo_Gaz,

    There is no reason to be concerned about asking 'very basic questions' here. None of us was born with any knowledge of photography. We have all been through the learning stages. Some of us learned about photography when we could ask our parents, friends, neighbors or walk into any cameras store. Yes, Photo_Gaz, back in the day one could walk into any camera store and ask about film, be helped and be treated with respect! The learning we did was under much easier conditions than you are dealing with. Please feel free to ask questions in a post or via a PM.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  5. #55
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    Although your instruction manual is of great help in sorting this kind of problem, the general rule is that you insert the small leader (the one with only half height) into the receiving sprocket, and you put the cartridge in position on the other side of the camera. Now you take down the lever which blocks the cartridge in position, and slightly tense the film turning the lever as if you were rewinding the film. This will make the film somehow flat on the camera. Now you turn the advancement lever until the upper holes of the film get caught in the upper teeth of the sprocket, when you see this happening you end the loading action with the lever, release the shutter, check again that both teeth correctly show inside both rows of holes, and close the back.
    If you now advance to 1, your picture 1 will certainly be on valid film. While advancing the film always check that the rewind knob turns, which means the film is actually advancing. If while advancing the film with the lever the rewind knob doesn't turn on its axis, open the back and repeat.

    In concise terms:
    - check before closing the back that both holes (upper and lower) correctly match the sprockets. Gently tense the film if it is not flat;
    - end the lever action and fire that shot before closing the back;
    - now close the back and advance to 1.

    Fabrizio

    PS Always load your film in subdued light. The film basis conducts light a bit like an optic fiber, so don't do the operation in full sun. If you have nowhere where to hide, at least turn yourself so as to project a shadow with your body over the camera.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  6. #56
    Photo_Gaz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Photo_Gaz,

    There is no reason to be concerned about asking 'very basic questions' here. None of us was born with any knowledge of photography. We have all been through the learning stages. Some of us learned about photography when we could ask our parents, friends, neighbors or walk into any cameras store. Yes, Photo_Gaz, back in the day one could walk into any camera store and ask about film, be helped and be treated with respect! The learning we did was under much easier conditions than you are dealing with. Please feel free to ask questions in a post or via a PM.

    Steve
    Thank you for your kind words! I have looked for photographic workshops/courses that I could attend in my local area. Unfortunately, there are none. The only things that come anywhere near close are AS Level Art and Design in the local college that lasts a year and only have a tiny photographic element.

    I've looked for the City and Guilds Photography diploma, but, again, nowhere local provides the course. Furthermore, I can only find a C&G Photo Imaging course on the actual site which gives me reason to believe that they're not evening offering such a course anymore. The "Photo Imaging" diplomas' content appears to be reliant on the use of digital technology rather than film based.

    Oh well! I'm having fun trial-ing and error-ing anyway, which, I think (at this stage anyway) is what counts.

    Thank you to you all for the advice.

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