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  1. #11

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    Folks, I appreciate the suggestion of simply mixing formulas outdoors and I have already been doing exactly that when possible.

    Yet, problems with mixing outside I have been constantly facing are unpredictable gusting winds, windblown debris and kamikaze bugs that inevitably find and dive into a half finished formula. Then there are the extremes in temperature like this weeks 106 degree summer day--nor can I mix something up outside in the winter when it's below freezing.

    My darkroom is the next best place to prepare these formulas--I certainly don't want to use my kitchen! Are there no better methods or alternatives?
    Last edited by konakoa; 07-14-2011 at 02:27 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12

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    Your garage if you have one. Better yet a neighbor's garage.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #13
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by konakoa View Post
    My darkroom is the next best place to prepare these formulas--I certainly don't want to use my kitchen! Are there no better methods or alternatives?
    No better place than the chemical preparation area in your darkroom. If it is a home darkroom, you certainly don't want to be doing this stuff in your living areas.

  4. #14
    BetterSense's Avatar
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    If you must do it in the darkroom, wear a dust mask, pour carefully, and wipe up after you are done.
    f/22 and be there.

  5. #15
    Diapositivo's Avatar
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    I only use liquid concentrates and I actually do all dilutions in the kitchen. Never spilled anything, but if it had to happen, it would be on enamel, easy to clean. Easy to change air as well. Powdered chemistry? No, thanks.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  6. #16

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    Anyplace you can easily rinse or wipe up the working surface is good for me. I put a shelf on the wet side of my darkroom and place the scale on it, and then when I'm done, I wipe up the working surface.

    Just be careful, and keep spills and dropped powders to a minimum. Use lab scoops/spatulas with deep sides for measuring small amounts. Don't put heaping amounts on them that will spill if your hand shakes a little - tap the spatula over the bottle to shake off any material that may fall off as you tranfer it to the scale.

    Also, it's really only the organic developing agents that you probably should be concerned about spilling. Sulfite, bromide, carbonate... don't fear those compounds.
    Kirk

    For up from the ashes, up from the ashes, grow the roses of success!

  7. #17

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    Just to add to Kirk's list, dust from fixer or it's components is real bad for film and paper.
    Bob

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