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  1. #11
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    That looks like bad fixing or washing. The fact that it turns color with time when exposed to light is the clue. Only some Silver salt or retained chemical will do that when you are talking about film. That, of course leads me to suspect fixing or washing.

    PE

  2. #12

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    Thank you for all the responses i really do appreciate the input.

    I forgot to mention that i am using fresh HC110 dil B. And i do have to stress that this problem has appeared only the last week. And only in Tri X, not with Fuji Across 100 which turn out perfect.

    I ve trie dwith both fresh Ilford and Tetenal fixers at 1+4.

    15 minutes might sound a bit long, yet this is how i m doing it and never had problems, until now that is. I really cant bring the temperature of all chemicals down, even the developer s temperature is increasing and i m measuring it constantly to compensate, if i see its rising fast.

    When i wash, i rinse for 4 times with water, each time inverting 30 times and in the end i pour distilled water with Photo Flo, and i leave it there to settle for like 5 minutes

  3. #13

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    For temperature control, I put all the bottles (dev, stop, fix) in a plastic tub and control the temperature of the water in that tub. Either the tub is big enough or I have a second tub for the tank, especially if the water is too deep in the first tub for the tank, etc. You can have a bottle of hot water or running hot water on the side and a pitcher (large beaker) of cold water with ice in it ready on the side too. Then you just add a few ml of hot or cold water to the tub as needed to keep its temperature within your tolerances. I can keep it within a quarter degree C if need be, under less difficult conditions than you face. However, that way should be sufficient to get it all to temperature before starting and keeping it at temperature between agitations.

  4. #14

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    It seems to me that you are doing more than you need to. Read my thread on page 1. I should have said that I just dunk in Photoflo (a few drops in distilled water). I don't let it sit. I'm sure you will see a variety of techniques here. Personally I try to keep it as simple as possible and always use fresh chemistry. Although it has worked for you I agree that 15min fix is more than enough but not causing the problem. I don't know how you monitor the developer temperature but I don't think that is necessary either. I start with mine at 68F which I am sure probably goes up a degree or two during development but that would only increase the contrast slightly. I suggest that you try a roll of Tri-X and a roll of a different brand of 400ISO and develop both in the same tank at the same time to see what happens.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #15

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    1. Prewash so long is really unnecessary and has been associated with problems. "I've always done it" is not the best reason for doing it. Is there really any reason for you to do it at all? I've never pre-soaked and always read that it is rare for it to be needed (only certain developers or films like Kodachrome). Try a 30 second pre-soak if you must.

    2. I thought it might be loading problems of film touching lower layers and gradually parting in the fix phase, but the tone goes into developed areas that seem equally well developed. Could it be the reverse? Perhaps good loading but really violent agitation, especially in the fixing phase?

    3. Washing by inverting 30 times is not the way to do it. The thing with washing is you need diffusion and that takes time.

    I've got negatives and prints I washed decades ago that are perfectly clear and unstained. Here's how I learned to do it and have done it because it is much more water wise than continuous flow and more consistent and more dependable:

    I rinse the fixer off the film and then put it in water for five minutes, knocking it a few times to dislodge bubbles and then letting it stand. If I'm around, I will give it a lazy spin occasionally, if at all. Every five minutes I drain well and refill with fresh water. After six changes (30 minutes) it is done.

    4. Soaking for five minutes in PhotoFlo is a bad idea. It just needs one minute. Long soaks in PhotoFlo have been reported to yield bad results, especially if your temperatures are high.

  6. #16

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    once again thank you very much for taking your time to answer,

    the tub is a bright idea actually, i should try it

    i ll skip the presoak and i ll use diffusion instead of agitation for washing and i ll let you know how it goes. I had no idea about photoflo, good this is clarified.

    btw i m using a wine precision electrinic thermometer and as soon as i agitate for the minute, insert it in the tank from the light proff bore that you pour the water and get the metering this way in like 15 secs, then lid back on and continue as usual

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by demdrys View Post
    i m using a wine precision electrinic thermometer and as soon as i agitate for the minute, insert it in the tank from the light proff bore that you pour the water and get the metering this way in like 15 secs, then lid back on and continue as usual
    I don't bother measuring the developer temperature in the tank. That really slows things down. If you keep the water bath within tolerance, then the temperature in the tank will be good.

    The main thing is to work consistently every time. The main thing to avoid is to have temperature controlled by ambient conditions. A water bath solves that.

    The thermometer can be in the water bath continuously, untouched. Agitate for 5 seconds by doing two inversions, replace tank in water bath, consult thermometer readout, add water if needed plus or minus (scoop out if water bath is too full), and by then it is time for the next agitation (every 30 seconds). 25 seconds is enough to monitor the bath and adjust. I spend more time watching the clock than adjusting. Alter the procedure to use times and agitation cycles that you are more used to.

  8. #18

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    It is possible that with high ambient temperatures, a good case can be made for a pre-soak of a minute or two in water that has been kept in its own bottle in the water bath. This would get the tank and reels and film all down to the temperature that the developer will be coming in at, so that one more variable is eliminated for the all important crucial development step.

  9. #19

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    Show me where a film manufacturer says to presoak film in water. They don`t . Except for sheet film which gets hand interleaved agitation to prevent sticking. Sheets in drones, rotary processor, or hangars do not get a presoak.

    Both Kodak and Ilford have nice instructions on their websites on how to develop film. Read and follow them.

  10. #20
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    Ronald;

    I have posted a Kodak pictorial guide by Kodak in which they use a pre-wet step. In addition, others here on APUG have tested a prewet and have shown that it does no harm and in fact can improve results. I suggest that you read those threads.

    PE

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