Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,851   Posts: 1,582,856   Online: 832
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Fixer 101 (?)

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Columbia River Gorge, WA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    92
    I have been using Photographer's Formulary TF-5 fixer for some time now and I am extremely satisfied with it. By neutralizing the fixer, they made it practically odor free. It's also perfect for pyro development as it has no effect on the image stain.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,130
    An acid fixer is unstable and will evenually begin to precipitate elemental sulfur. To prevent this from happening all fixers contain sodium sulfite. The sulfite acts as a preservative in that it combines with sulfur as it forms to form thiosulfate. This protective action will continue until all the sulfite has been used up. At this point the fixer will begin to precipitate sulfur and it must be discarded.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13
    yeknom02's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    State College, PA, United States
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    308
    Images
    5
    To answer tkamiya, I'm trying to shop for alkaline fixers since I'm trying to eliminate an acid stop bath from my process. My theory is that my current process (alkaline developer, acidic stop, and who-knows fixer) is far more abusive on film than an all-alkaline process (alkaline developer, water stop, alkaline fixer). I've seen some spots on a few images, and I'm wondering if changing my development techniques will help. Also, I'd save all my stop bath for paper developing.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST
    My Flickr Gallery

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,130
    Quote Originally Posted by yeknom02 View Post
    My theory is that my current process (alkaline developer, acidic stop, and who-knows fixer) is far more abusive on film than an all-alkaline process (alkaline developer, water stop, alkaline fixer).
    AFAIK, there is no data to substantiate such an assertion. There have been long and lively threads on APUG about the gelatine iso-electric point, swelling at various pH's, etc. I have not seen anything conclusive.

    There is always the problem of development not being quickly stopped in an alkaline system.

    A simple solution of sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfite provides a alkaline fixer.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,071
    The traditional fixer has existed for many MANY decades and used by many MANY photographers and labs successfully. If you are having problems with staining or spotting, the issue isn't likely be the fixer itself but rather, how it is being used. It could be caused by something else, too.

    Good luck in finding the problem though.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin