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  1. #11
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Losse
    Ian,

    I think you should look a little beyond the work posted here on APUG. While there has been some very nice work posted on APUG. There is much more out there in the world.

    I absolutely disagree that subject matter ultimately dictates format & film choices. Just because your shooting photographs of people does not mean you can't work with large format equipment. Sally Mann worked with 8x10 for her family images, and I read that was even hand held. Michael A Smith published a book a while back of portraits from a boys camp. And View Camera just published an article on a guy who shot 8x10 color photographs of porn stars. What about Avedon's American West Series? It was shot with an 8x10 camera.

    The photographer should be the only one to "dictate" what film and format choice they want to make based on their vision.

    I think you missed my point George

    "So choice of format is made after taking into account a wide range of factors, which really relate to practibility and expectations."

    Personally I work across all formats, and in my post did mention as an example the large format portraits by Irving Penn. I choose the largest practical format to be able to work at a reasonable pace and produce high quality images.

    I made this post because there seems to be a snobbery around using larger format cameras, and this isn't exclusively a large format forum.

    Photography is not ultimately about the format used, but it is about the images produced. Craft is far more important whatever camera, film etc you use to achieve the resultant images.

  2. #12
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Hi Ian, thank you very much for thinking of me! You made my day.
    Whatever format, if I like a photo for whatever reason, it doesn't matter what size/format it is, it's a great photo (i.e. I love Cheryl Jacobs) and am lucky to appreciate it.
    By the way, I'm still learning how to use my Hasselblad! Yay! Can't wait to give it a 'real' workout. It may not be quite as big as some of you, but I'm over the moon.

  3. #13

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    Alas Ian as we know there is snobbery everywhere

    For years now we've had not only is my format better than your format, but also my glass is better than yours within the same format. I like Leica's (don't take this personally Leica users) for the way they look and feel. I also agree they can produce beautiful pictures in the right hands, but how many times do we see people in the street wearing them as point and shoot medallions?

    At the end of the day though they are all just tools and as with all tools once you have the hang of it, then you can use it. With different formats there are varying amounts to learn, but the final process is the darkroom and a printed image. Select the tool for the final image you want and have a picture regardless of which tool you chose.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicole McGrade
    (i.e. I love Cheryl Jacobs)
    Me too!!! She is GREAT!

    Let us bath her in Rodinal 1+50 to show her the appreciation

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    Me too!!! She is GREAT!

    Let us bath her in Rodinal 1+50 to show her the appreciation
    Morten - would you like to borrow my tin hat after that one mmmm the scent of Rodinal on a female

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    Morten - would you like to borrow my tin hat after that one mmmm the scent of Rodinal on a female
    I don't need the tin hat...I got my own

    I meant it in the most positive way!

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by modafoto
    I don't need the tin hat...I got my own

  8. #18

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    IMHO bigger is better when all cameras are on tripods.
    Tripod here does not only mean composition exercise but subjects categories which should be considered for this comparison.
    In 35mm BW, the break even point among tonal scale, resolution, grain and acutance can't be properly accomodated on a stamp size negative. Of course not always that point is intended to be reached.
    sergio caetano

  9. #19
    Sjixxxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TPPhotog
    I like Leica's (don't take this personally Leica users) for the way they look and feel. I also agree they can produce beautiful pictures in the right hands, but how many times do we see people in the street wearing them as point and shoot medallions?
    The only time that I've ever spotted a Leica "In the wild" was a guy who I kept crossing paths with one day who was using it to shoot all his touristy stuff. Does that count?
    Gear: Camera, Brain, Light.
    Website - FB

  10. #20
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Sally Mann worked with 8x10 for her family images, and I read that was even hand held.
    Yes, Sally Mann used large format (4x5 and 8x10) for most of her photographs of children. She also posed nearly every shot, and her endlessly patient children held the pose for many exposures until she had gotten what she wanted. A very big part of the success Sally Mann achieved in her work was due to the extraordinary modeling skills of her children.

    I don't pose children. I don't work with child models. Actually, I don't pose anyone. A big factor in my work is motion and spontaneity. I can work that way in 35mm and 6x6. I intensely dislike trying to use a 4x5 to capture fast-moving spontaneity. It's counterintuitive to me. I hate using a tripod for my children's work, as I have to be flexible enough to jump forward when I see an opportunity for a great close-up, or jump backward when the splashing from a bathtub threatens my lens.

    If Sally Mann was hand-holding an 8x10, she was far more woman than I, literally. At 5'8" and 110 lbs, there's no way on earth I could manage to handhold an 8x10. I have trouble hand-holding my Speed Graphic, although I'm liking the effects of the effort on my biceps and triceps. LOL.

    In my opinion, bigger is only better when you can still get the shot. Why would I allow myself to miss great moments due to insisting on a larger format? Why would I ever allow a format to change my style and approach? I can't think of a single good reason.

    The photographer should be the only one to "dictate" what film and format choice they want to make based on their vision.
    Yes, I agree. Based on my vision, I feel that Ian is correct that "bigger is not always better."

    Anyway....

    About that Rodinal bath.....

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