Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,847   Posts: 1,582,760   Online: 886
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 33
  1. #11
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,325
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    For the life of me I cannot understand why Kodak did this in the first place. Didn't they test things thoroughly?

    Rjmeyer314's comment makes me wonder why Kodak, and ONLY Kodak allowed this fautly theory to 'develop'. As he says, the ridges prevented as free a flow of solution, as was necessary, and as was entirely possible with spirals we use today.
    With a roll of 35mm film, the ridges touched the film just about where the perforations are- causing no problems at all. Our need to improvise for other film types is what causes the contact issue. It was a cheap, "hobbiest" piece of gear, like the "daylight developer" system, a bakelite tank that allowed you to place the unopened film cassette in a small opening, feed the film through to a tank and then do all of your chemistry without exposing the film to light. It works fine on old Kodak cassettes loaded with thick Kodak film, like PanX or Verichrome. Try it on a roll of Ilford, or Foma, Efke or even modern Kodak and you will be swearing in seconds.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    127.0.0.1
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    604
    Here's another idea, perhaps much easier to implement for short lenghts of film than the PVC drain pipe processing tank I previously posted. This is from Popular Mechanics, October 1947. This article was written with movie film processing in mind, but you can adapt it easily. You'll be doing tray processing, but the methods described are simple to implement.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=0N4...page&q&f=false

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    127.0.0.1
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    604
    You also might be able to adapt a Morse G3 movie film developing tank. They come up on ebay all the time. They are designed to handle both 16mm and 35mm film. Since the film is spooled from one core to another, back and forth, it may work with other widths of film up to 35mm.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    127.0.0.1
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    604
    You might also talk to a machine or welding shop in your area about making you some custom width reels. An extremely easy way to do it would be to cut down and reweld some 35mm stainless reels. They would just need to know the precise spacing you require between the spirals. I doubt this would cost more than $25 per reel.

    If I needed custom sized reels for short lengths of film, I'd probably take this approach. I believe I could do it with my chop saw and MIG welder, although it probably wouldn't look as good as what a machine/welding shop could do.

    Maybe the S.K. Grimes shop, who I believe is an APUG supporter, could do this.
    Last edited by SkipA; 07-28-2011 at 11:09 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,925
    Images
    60
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    For the life of me I cannot understand why Kodak did this in the first place. Didn't they test things thoroughly?

    Rjmeyer314's comment makes me wonder why Kodak, and ONLY Kodak allowed this fautly theory to 'develop'. As he says, the ridges prevented as free a flow of solution, as was necessary, and as was entirely possible with spirals we use today.
    I've used aprons a lot (particularly with 616 film, but also with 120), and they worked well. You do need an apron that is just the right size for the width of film involved.

    They worked well in the Kodak tanks, but not so well in others that didn't have the same dimensions or the same "stub" at the bottom of the tank.

    I stopped using them regularly because the Kodak tanks don't permit inversion.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
    ic-racer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,382
    For the apron to work, the film width must match the apron width. The ridges on the apron are to suspend the film so it does not touch.

    To solve your problem I'd just modify some reels. Plastic reels and tanks are cheap or free. I use a modified Jobo reel for 8.5x11 (Minox).

  7. #17
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,347
    Thanks all. It is amazing how seemingly simple question can end up being so difficult to find a definitive answer for. I still think that 'standard' click steps on adjustable reels should have been abandoned in favor of odd sizes never being a problem. But Americans always like 'convenience before universality' so the marketplace disqualifies my opinion.

    I liked the 1947 Popular Mechanis article and others here have contributed well to this quest. Thanks. - David Lyga.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,075
    I wonder if you could rig up custom stops for an adjustable reel using stainless steel pipe clamps or something similar. Even nylon cable ties might work.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    127.0.0.1
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    604
    The simplest solution that would provide the same level of processing quality and ease of use as a 35mm steel reel is to have a machine shop cut some down and reweld to size.

    Now if you took that a step further, a cut down reel could be made adjustable. Cut them apart close to one spiral, weld small stainless tubes with an ID slightly greater than the wire size of the reel onto each short stub, tap two of the tubes near their outer ends for a set screw. Insert the longer prongs of the other reel into the tubes of the first one to the desired depth, and screw down the set screw.

    It would take some precision welding, but that is not beyond the ability of a decent machine shop. Frankly I'd rather have reels cut down and rewelded to the exact width I need, as it is simple to do, but the variable width reel could be done.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    8,021
    Images
    4
    You can make a long processing tray (or tube) with a trip to a hardware store for some PVC pipe, and develop the long roll like sheet film. To make the tray, cut the pipe into a semicircle, and make "feet" for the ends, so you don't have to hold it level the whole time.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin