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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Horsham, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    751
    The Yankee tanks are easy to make adjustable for sizes between 120 and 16mm. Since the size is adjusted by means of a simple spring in the center, you just need to adjust the reel to the height you need, and cut a notch in the center spindle for the spring to fall in to. A Dremel tool works well for this.
    "Panic not my child, the Great Yellow Father has your hand"--Larry Dressler

  2. #32
    Murray Kelly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Brisbane, QLD. Australia
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    427
    I have an oldish Patterson tank here that has the adjustable clipping section of the top spiral above the top spiral with the grooves underneath. This means you can push the two together as close as you want - it will even go down to Minox width. The working distance is governed by grooves at the appropriate places on the central tube. For 16mm I merely had to cut/file a groove on the central tube at the right place and it works fine. I know someone who has done this for the Advantix films he uses.

    Most other tanks I've seen have the clipping mechanism between the spirals and it wouldn't be nearly so easy to change..

  3. #33
    cmacd123's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Stittsville, Ontario
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,095
    The old commercial labs almost always were set up for a "dip and dunk" system. film clipped to a holder, and sometimes folded in eh middle as in Ron's Graduated cylinder method. Those machines would automatically lift the film every minute and lower it on the next station. if the development time was 5 minutes, the developing tank would have 5 stations, the next cycle "dunking" the film in stop bath. The commercial tanks were long enough to take a regular roll of 120 or perhaps 116.

    If your film was relatively short, You could just make up a square wooden tank, lined with plastic and drape your film from the top. A cover would allow you to stay in the light between steps.
    Charles MacDonald
    aa508@ncf.ca
    I still live just beyond the fringe in Stittsville

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