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  1. #1

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    Lens flare and film halation

    I recently purchased a decent amount of Lucky SHD100 film and developed the first roll yesterday. When scanning the negatives I noticed that some frames had intense light anomalies. I attached the examples below. First I thought it's caused by the the lack (?) of anti-halation layer of Lucky films, but as I didn't use lens hood when taking the shots, I figured it's more likely lens flare. However, I'm still wondering if the flare would have been weaker if I had used some quality film and if lens flare is somehow magnified if there is no anti-halation backing.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails LuckySHD100Pentax(Scan-110731-0014).jpg   LuckySHD100Pentax(Scan-110731-0015).jpg   LuckySHD100Pentax(Scan-110731-0003).jpg   LuckySHD100Pentax(Scan-110731-0016).jpg   LuckySHD100Pentax(Scan-110731-0017).jpg  

    I like my film stirred, not shaken.
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  2. #2
    zsas's Avatar
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    Is this the first time you have used the camera to take photographs? Is not, did it flare with other film stocks or is this only isolated to the Lucky film?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by zsas View Post
    Is this the first time you have used the camera to take photographs? Is not, did it flare with other film stocks or is this only isolated to the Lucky film?
    I've shot several rolls with the camera and they've been fine. However, this was the first time I used Helios-44-2 lens and Lucky film. I don't shoot often with bright sunlight, but on those particular frames the sun was at about 2-3 o'clock.
    I like my film stirred, not shaken.
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  4. #4
    daveandiputra's Avatar
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    Hi juri, that don't looks like the usual halo effect caused by the lack of anti halation layer on lucky films. Usually the glow comes when the object is bright colored. I'm more inclined to say that is caused by flares.

  5. #5
    Stephen Benskin's Avatar
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    There's a chance that is caused by fogging.

  6. #6

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    Did you use a lens shade?
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Did you use a lens shade?
    I mentioned it in the first post.

    All in all, I think the flare is just a combination of a badly coated lens and sunny weather. I'll just keep shooting the Lucky and observe how it acts under different cunditions.
    I like my film stirred, not shaken.
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  8. #8
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I've shot a good bit of Lucky, never had this experience, must be flair.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  9. #9
    Worker 11811's Avatar
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    Have you eliminated the possibility that it might be fogged film?

    I can't tell exactly where the light is coming from but, in my experience, flare happens more often when you are shooting directly into a bright light but it doesn't seem like there is bright light coming from the scene.

    I would try shooting the same film in another camera or shooting the same film and camera with a different lens. If those two tests are inconclusive, you could try wrapping the camera in aluminum foil and gaffer's tape to seal out the light. If you have an Ever-Ready case for the camera, try using the camera inside the case.

    Even if my idea is wrong, it is a simple matter to eliminate it as a possible cause.

    Always try to eliminate the simple things first.
    Randy S.

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  10. #10

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    Curiously, despite the different orientation the marks in shots two and three appear to be similar and in the same-ish place on the neg. Wouldn't that suggest some sort of leak in the camera? Possibly also combined with differing amounts of time between shots for the leak to darken the film to a different degree in the other shots.

    Worker11811's idea of eliminating the light-leak possibility first might be a good one. It wouldn't need to use a whole roll as you can try a hood, or shoot from a shaded direction/location, to reduce flare on the same film - with/without hood in combination with/without camera-body blackout. Also, do the dark areas go outside the frame, on the edges of the film?

    Ooops, forgot to say, I have used Lucky and there was a little halation around really contrasty bright areas, but nothing remotely like in your examples so it 'should' be something else.
    Last edited by MartinP; 08-01-2011 at 01:02 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: forgot something

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