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  1. #11

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    I reckon you should try contact printing a paper neg. Simply make the best projection print you can,on paper with no reverse-side makers imprints, and sandwich it to get your positive. There are heaps of threads on this.
    If you had many to do, rephotographing the slide has worked well for me,but you do need pretty specialised gear to do a good job.

  2. #12

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    EL,

    Until recently Kodak made a panchromatic RC paper called Panalure intended for making prints from color negatives. To get the best results from color slides you really need to reversal process a panchromatic paper. After Kodak stopped making papers there remained an european company that still made such a paper. But they may have also stopped manufacture due to lack of demand. I would see if you could obtain either of these papers.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-01-2011 at 08:02 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13

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    Another possibility would be to make an internegative using a slow sheet film and then contact print this.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    EL,

    Until recently Kodak made a panchromatic RC paper called Panalure intended for making prints from color negatives. To get the best results from color slides you really need to reversal process a panchromatic paper. After Kodak stopped making papers there remained an european company that still made such a paper. But they may have also stopped manufacture due to lack of demand. I would see if you could obtain either of these papers.
    He has a black and white slide not a color one so he has no need at all for a panchromatic paper.

    I don't really understand "no need for a paper negative" just because he has a print that is one of his worst. So with a convoluted improvised reversal process one can get a bad print and this is somehow preferable to a pretty simple straightforward process likely to yield a decent print?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    He has a black and white slide
    Saw slide and my mind fixated on that. Most people who want a print from a slide have a color slide.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Saw slide and my mind fixated on that. Most people who want a print from a slide have a color slide.
    Yep. But there was Scala and other films can be reversal processed.

    I've been tempted to do some black and white slides myself but stopped short due to what he's running into - not nearly as easy to print well as a negative is, if I decided I wanted prints.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I don't really understand "no need for a paper negative" just because he has a print that is one of his worst. So with a convoluted improvised reversal process one can get a bad print and this is somehow preferable to a pretty simple straightforward process likely to yield a decent print?
    I was figuring out the process of reversal processing paper. Now all that's left is for me to tweak the process a bit, and I should consistently be good prints.

    Never did I saw that bad print was as good as it's going to get. When I get another chance to print, I should be able to tweak the process to get what I want. For this session, I was just happy I got the process to work.

    I am aware of the process of making paper negatives and then printing those, but I dont see how that would be any faster or more convenient. I'd have to develop those prints, wait for them to dry, store them until I can print them, and then print them. The reversal printing process takes a while for each individual print, but I do have a positive print when i'm done. It looks like all I have left is to perfect contrast and I'm good to go. I personally dont have any contrast filters; I've borrowed some from the school darkroom, so I'll be ordering some when I get paid

    In my mind, the only advantage I can see to having a paper negative is the paper negative isnt ran through a bleach or clear bath. I dont know how well that stuff will wash out of FB paper... I guess I'll make some good prints and see how long they last before I see any damage. If they deteriorate within a few weeks or months, I guess I'll go the paper neg route



    EDIT:
    I hope this post doesnt seem like i'm ranting or bashing anyone; i'm really not. This is just a process I was curious about. I might end up doing paper negs when I print slides. At the very least, I can say I've reversal processed paper, and that seems worth the time for me to figure it out
    "I have captured the light and arrested its flight! The sun itself shall draw my pictures!"

    -Louis Daguerre, 1839-

  8. #18
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    I did this when I was in school, just to see if I could make it work. I did, but I never used it for anything. It was an interesting exercise though. I'd have to dig up my notes but I do remember having some staining issues with the paper. I recall that I overcame that, but I'd have to look to see how. I also remember staining my fingers and fingernails being careless one night. I'd avoid that, it took weeks for the stain to grow out of my nails.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Existing Light View Post
    EDIT:
    I hope this post doesnt seem like i'm ranting or bashing anyone; i'm really not. This is just a process I was curious about. I might end up doing paper negs when I print slides. At the very least, I can say I've reversal processed paper, and that seems worth the time for me to figure it out
    Totally understandable and fair enough. If I'd read the original post as "I think it's cool to play around with this unusual process" I'd have never suggested a paper negative or film internegative. I was reading it as, "what's the best way to get a good print from this slide of my dearly departed dog?" That might well be a different question and a different problem.

  10. #20
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    Existing,
    keep us updated on your progress please.

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