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  1. #21
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The HC-110 bottle is 473 ml, which is the same as:
    - 16 US ounces, which is the same as
    - 1 US pint, which is the same as
    - 1/2 US quart, which is the same as
    - 1/8 US gallon.

    When the bottle says "makes 2 US gallons" of working solution, it is actually referring to dilution A, which you probably don't want to use.

    It is dilution B that most of the published development times refer to.

    Your 16 US ounce (1/8 US gallon) bottle will make 4 US gallons of dilution B (1 + 31) working solution if you dilute every last bit of it accurately.

    That is just over 15 liters.

    That means one bottle is enough to develop 30 rolls of 120, if you are only developing 1 roll of 120 in each 500 ml of dilution B working solution.

    Alternatively, that means one bottle is enough to develop 15 sheets of film if you are only developing one sheet in each liter of dilution B working solution.

    There are techniques that permit you to get more rolls out of each bottle, but I'd suggest you work with these volumes and this dilution at first.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    The HC-110 bottle is 473 ml, which is the same as:
    - 16 US ounces, which is the same as
    - 1 US pint, which is the same as
    - 1/2 US quart, which is the same as
    - 1/8 US gallon.

    When the bottle says "makes 2 US gallons" of working solution, it is actually referring to dilution A, which you probably don't want to use.

    It is dilution B that most of the published development times refer to.

    Your 16 US ounce (1/8 US gallon) bottle will make 4 US gallons of dilution B (1 + 31) working solution if you dilute every last bit of it accurately.

    That is just over 15 liters.

    That means one bottle is enough to develop 30 rolls of 120, if you are only developing 1 roll of 120 in each 500 ml of dilution B working solution.

    Alternatively, that means one bottle is enough to develop 15 sheets of film if you are only developing one sheet in each liter of dilution B working solution.

    There are techniques that permit you to get more rolls out of each bottle, but I'd suggest you work with these volumes and this dilution at first.
    Thank you very much!

    This clarified things a bit more, so i have to forget about what "To make" write on the bottle and just dilute for dilution B which will give me more liquids there to work with, interesting, i also want to stick with that and not looking for another methods to get more rolls, for 1 bottle to develop up to 30 rolls is more than enough for me, i have 2 bottles so that means about 60 rolls or say almost 30 sheets, well, for this year and next year i don't think i will go over 60-100 films, so i think i will have one or two developers running fine for me before i use the other developers, now should i start with TAMX or HC110 if i will shoot soon?

  3. #23
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Two questions - how are you processing your sheet film and is it 4 x 5?

    Unless your developing process limits you to single sheets in each litre (tray developing), you should understand that a liter of dilution B working solution has enough chemical capacity to develop a lot more than a single 4 x 5 sheet - in fact, with careful technique, the right equipment and enough practice, you could develop as many as twenty 4 x 5 sheets in the same litre before it would be exhausted.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Two questions - how are you processing your sheet film and is it 4 x 5?

    Unless your developing process limits you to single sheets in each litre (tray developing), you should understand that a liter of dilution B working solution has enough chemical capacity to develop a lot more than a single 4 x 5 sheet - in fact, with careful technique, the right equipment and enough practice, you could develop as many as twenty 4 x 5 sheets in the same litre before it would be exhausted.
    Really i don't know which processing of sheets i will use yet, i started a thread here about it and got many many posts, but what i see is that i may avoiding that tray developing, if i will use the daylight tank then it will take 1L, if i will try to get that MOD so i have to buy Paterson Multi-3 reels tank which will take almost 1L as well, or go with BTZS tubes which it will take very minimal chemicals [i really don't know what volume it is recommended for that], so whatever methods i will use i will be sure i will have enough chemicals there, in fact i am also going to use Caffenol as this is cheap and i have the chemicals to prepare and it will not be big deal if i waste it, most those Kodak/Ilford chemicals i have to buy overseas which is costly with shipping and the restrictions for chemicals.

    Maybe i have to divide the chemicals into two parts, one for 120 and the other for LF sheets [4x5], then i will not be confused about volumes remaining for each.
    Last edited by TareqPhoto; 08-04-2011 at 10:53 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #25
    MattKing's Avatar
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    If you use something like BTZS tubes that permit use of minimal amounts of chemicals, you can use the following rules of thumb to determine how much HC-110 dilution B needs to be used:

    1) for 120 film, use an amount that is the greater of:
    a) the amount needed to cover the reels in the tank, or
    b) 192 ml (200 ml is what I would use); and
    2) for 4 x 5 sheet film, use an amount that is the greater of:
    a) the amount required by the tanks/tubes/reels to ensure all of the sheets are in contact with or covered by the developer, or
    b) 48 ml (50 ml is what I would use) times the number of 4 x 5 sheets being processed.

    In most cases it is the requirements of the tanks or tubes you are using that set the minimum volume, but not always.

    You shouldn't have to make up separate amounts of stock for 120 and 4 x 5. You will, however, most likely need to use different amounts of working solution because of the differing amounts required by the different tanks and reels or tubes.

    If you buy the MOD insert, you can of course use the same Paterson tank and Paterson reels to develop your 120 film.

    Good luck, and I hope you have fun!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If you use something like BTZS tubes that permit use of minimal amounts of chemicals, you can use the following rules of thumb to determine how much HC-110 dilution B needs to be used:

    1) for 120 film, use an amount that is the greater of:
    a) the amount needed to cover the reels in the tank, or
    b) 192 ml (200 ml is what I would use); and
    2) for 4 x 5 sheet film, use an amount that is the greater of:
    a) the amount required by the tanks/tubes/reels to ensure all of the sheets are in contact with or covered by the developer, or
    b) 48 ml (50 ml is what I would use) times the number of 4 x 5 sheets being processed.

    In most cases it is the requirements of the tanks or tubes you are using that set the minimum volume, but not always.

    You shouldn't have to make up separate amounts of stock for 120 and 4 x 5. You will, however, most likely need to use different amounts of working solution because of the differing amounts required by the different tanks and reels or tubes.

    If you buy the MOD insert, you can of course use the same Paterson tank and Paterson reels to develop your 120 film.

    Good luck, and I hope you have fun!
    Thank you very much!

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