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  1. #11
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    Well, I took a print that I hated, and made it more bearable.

    The pencil marks at the top right actually don't show on the print, the scanner seems to pick everything up.

    Anyway, there'll be a lot more where this one comes from, I think.
    That's beautiful! I like the grain, too.
    Those who know, shoot film

  2. #12
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    eddie, thanks. I have been using oils but failed at colouring anything where a steady hand was needed.
    The erasers are a good idea. I'll give that a go.
    Thanks!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by IloveTLRs View Post
    That's beautiful! I like the grain, too.
    Thanks. I think the grain is caused by the scanner. I could never figure out how to work those things.

  4. #14

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    What kind of color pencils did you use? I've been wanting to try this myself.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  5. #15
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    Any colored pencil will work. I have Prismacolor, Crayola, Marshall's, and Walnut Hollow . If you want subtle colors, avoid a sharp point. I use fine grained sand paper to grind down the point. It makes the application more even, and easier to "buff".
    For paper choices, matte fiber, with a smooth finish. MGIV is a good choice among available papers. If you use paint, it has enough tooth to hold the oils but not too much, where the paint will bunch up.

    The best thing to do is save your reject prints to play with. Don't get discouraged. It takes a while to figure it out, but it is a lot of fun.
    Here's an example I did which is half painted (not how I normally do it, but for the demonstration...)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails inprogress.jpg  

  6. #16
    eddie's Avatar
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    Thought you might want to see some of the tools that went into painting that half of the photograph:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1080.jpg  

  7. #17
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    eddie, looks good.
    Are the Marshall's oils just regular oil paints?

    I used a Faber-Castell pencil.

  8. #18

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    So... you used mixture of materials: pencils and artist paints. I never thought Q tips and cotton swabs as tools for the task, but that makes sense. Thank you for sharing that.

    How did you get such a brilliant color on middle of the "leaves" where density is so high? I'm surprised the grey tone of b&w image didn't show through.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  9. #19
    eddie's Avatar
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    Any good quality oils will work. Marshall's makes "Extra Strong" versions of many of their colors. I use these when I want more intensity. They also make "Extender", which I use when I want to thin the paint, and get a more pastel look. You can also use linseed oil to thin the paints.
    The thing to remember is that you're applying the paint so thinly that it is transparent. Any texture in the original Black and White will show through.
    The reason to use Q-Tips, cotton balls, medical applicators, and toothpicks wound with cotton is because brushes will add texture. While you may want a more painterly effect (and adding dimension and brush marks), I prefer a smoother finish.

  10. #20
    eddie's Avatar
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    This photo shows all you need to try hand-painting. It's inexpensive, a lot of fun, and can really alter the look of your work. I'm sure other hand-colorists have their own techniques (and I hope they add to this thread) but I'll go through my workflow.

    I generally use Ilford MGIV matte fiber. After the prints have dried, I start to apply the oils using either cotton balls, Q-Tips, etc. depending on the size of the area to be covered- large balls for larger areas, small applicators for smaller spaces. Once I apply them, I carefully remove the excess, being careful not to spread into adjacent areas where I want a different color. When first starting out, I recommend that you don't apply different colors to adjacent areas. It's easy to get some bleed. Instead, paint alternating areas allowing them to dry before returning to paint other areas. Eventually, you'll develop the ability to work with different colors in adjacent areas, but first you need to get control of your removal technique. (As an aside, I find cool colors take longer to dry. Warm colors are quicker. When it's humid, blues can take weeks to dry. Yellows may only take a day. A chemist once told me it was because of the cobalt in the paint, though I have no idea...). When it comes to the border of the print, some people use painters tape to mask it. I don't, as I find the paint builds up at the tape. Instead, I go into the border and deal with it later.

    Once the painting is finished, and completely dry, I go back to deal with the borders. I use a straightedge and harder erasers to erase the paint. The reason I have different erasers is because each type works better at different tasks. Hard ones (usually gray or white) are better at removing paint. Soft ones (usually pink) are better at smoothing pencil marks. Since the paint gets on the eraser, I rub the erasers on fine grit sandpaper to remove the paint as I work.

    This "tutorial" is just my way of doing things. I hope others will chime in with their techniques.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1923.jpg  

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