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  1. #1
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    First go and hand-colouring...

    Well, I took a print that I hated, and made it more bearable.

    The pencil marks at the top right actually don't show on the print, the scanner seems to pick everything up.

    Anyway, there'll be a lot more where this one comes from, I think.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img249.jpg  

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    Focus No. 9's Avatar
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    looks good to me. something I wish to try. what kind of paper did you use? I look at thrift stores for old photographs but mostly find glossy prints which wouldn't work too well.

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    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Try sepia toning a print first, then use water based dyes,the colours often blend in better with a toned image.

    Ian

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    I haven't hand colored a print in many years but when I was doing some I used a matte surfaced warm tone paper (Agfa Portriga Rapid Warm Tone) with Marshall oils. As I recall you needed to let them dry for a pretty long time.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

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    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There's two approaches to hand colouring, the main US way is with Marshall's oils, because this sits on top of the image this always looks hand coloured. The European way is/was mainly to use colour retouching dyes which sink into the emulsion leaving no trace on the suface, the finest exponent of this technique was the late Bob Carlos Clarke, many of his hand coloured images could easily be mistaken for full colour originals.

    Two teqniques the results are like chalk and cheese.

    Ian

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    Very nice!!
    Nikon 35mm, Mamiya 645 & RB67, Leica IIIb, other bits and pieces

  7. #7
    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    Thanks for the hints all.
    Have you seen prices for those oils?? No thanks, not yet anyway.

    I'm going to try to find something that will make the pencils run a bit to cause them to blend. But colouring out of focus areas is kinda hard. I'll have to try a more suitable print.

    The paper is Ilford FB MG.

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    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Get an old colour ink cartridge and mix your own dyes, it does work I've used them for wood stains as well

    Ian

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    tomalophicon's Avatar
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    Thanks Ian, I'll have a look at what I have.

  10. #10
    eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomalophicon View Post
    Thanks for the hints all.
    Have you seen prices for those oils?? No thanks, not yet anyway.

    I'm going to try to find something that will make the pencils run a bit to cause them to blend. But colouring out of focus areas is kinda hard. I'll have to try a more suitable print.

    The paper is Ilford FB MG.
    Any oils will work. It doesn't have to be Marshall's. Try a cheap tube, or two, from your local art supply store.
    You don't need to make the pencils "run" either. You can buff them with an eraser. I use Eraserstiks. They're pencil shaped erasers (getting hard to find) which will help blend the pencils, and soften the texture of the lead. Try it with any eraser, though. Just make sure it's clean, and stays clean. With the Eraserstiks, I rub it on fine grade sandpaper, both to keep it clean, and shape it for the space I'm blending.

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