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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smudger View Post
    Coated on a base Kodak never dared use for any other consumer film.
    Wasn't Technical Pan coated on this same base (ESTAR-AH) for the 35mm product?

    Just noticed that several websites carry this particular discussion; how embarrassing......
    Last edited by ricardo12458; 08-09-2011 at 06:58 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    The 2475 I have in my film freezer has to be exposed at EI 200 to get through the base fog, and you have a rather compressed density range on the film.

  3. #23
    mts
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    2475 was named recording film because its principal use was to record oscilloscope traces of fast events or in high-speed motion picture recording. The usual developer was either D-19 for hand processing, or Kodak Versamat automatic processing for long lengths.
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  4. #24
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    2475 (expired) versus Tri-X

    Here are two images I made in 1985 during the last apparition of Halley's comet. These are about 45 sec. unguided exposures made with f/1.7 50mm lens and processed in D-19 (2475, Halley-1) and D-76 (Tri-X, Halley-2), if I recall correctly. Both images are almost full-frame, viz. scans of about 80% of the 35mm frame.

    The exposures were made on a moonless night with a clear and cold New Mexico sky and no exterior lights to interfere by brightening the sky.

    I believe the 2475 was about ten years out of date at that time and had been kept frozen until use. I post these here just to add interest to the discussion.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Halley-2.jpg   Halley-1.jpg  
    By denying the facts, any paradox can be sustained--Galileo

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mts View Post
    Here are two images I made in 1985 during the last apparition of Halley's comet.
    Eleven years before the OP was born .
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    Again, I suggest piggybacking a strip on another roll that you develop before you even worry about how to rate it.
    I don't have the equipment for that at the moment.

    Quote Originally Posted by mts View Post
    Here are two images I made in 1985 during the last apparition of Halley's comet. These are about 45 sec. unguided exposures made with f/1.7 50mm lens and processed in D-19 (2475, Halley-1) and D-76 (Tri-X, Halley-2), if I recall correctly. Both images are almost full-frame, viz. scans of about 80% of the 35mm frame.

    The exposures were made on a moonless night with a clear and cold New Mexico sky and no exterior lights to interfere by brightening the sky.

    I believe the 2475 was about ten years out of date at that time and had been kept frozen until use. I post these here just to add interest to the discussion.
    So that's how grainy it was.

    Tonight's the meteor shower. I might get a chance to use this film after all.
    Waiting for the film to thaw out.
    Last edited by ricardo12458; 08-12-2011 at 03:10 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: adding quote

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricardo12458 View Post
    I don't have the equipment for that at the moment
    All it takes is a metal tank and reel.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    You don't even need to shoot to test it. Just piggyback a little snip onto another roll the next time you develop film. Make sure it is emulsion side out when you put it on the reel, so the two films are base to base. My guess is that it will be black or dark gray.
    It might not really matter, since I'm taking a long exposure with it.

    The only reason I would use this film would be for astronomical photography, especially for something this old, to get over the base fog.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    All it takes is a metal tank and reel.
    I don't develop my own film.
    Last edited by ricardo12458; 08-12-2011 at 03:42 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricardo12458 View Post
    I don't develop my own film.
    Labs will do clip tests, usually for about $5. Snip of a piece and stow it in a black film cartridge and give it to the lab. Better than taking a bunch of shots to test. It will use up less of the film.

    Or just use your paper developer and fixer in a tray in the dark. You are just testing to develop the fog, so it is not that critical in terms of what developer you use or for how long.
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by ricardo12458 View Post
    It might not really matter, since I'm taking a long exposure with it.

    The only reason I would use this film would be for astronomical photography, especially for something this old, to get over the base fog.



    I don't develop my own film.
    I do now. How long should I develop using D-76? (only b&w developer at the moment)

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